Female salaries – Feminaust http://feminaust.org/ Fri, 23 Apr 2021 13:59:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 https://feminaust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Female salaries – Feminaust http://feminaust.org/ 32 32 Pregnant women in Ontario are now eligible for COVID-19 vaccines https://feminaust.org/pregnant-women-in-ontario-are-now-eligible-for-covid-19-vaccines/ https://feminaust.org/pregnant-women-in-ontario-are-now-eligible-for-covid-19-vaccines/#respond Fri, 23 Apr 2021 13:17:05 +0000 https://feminaust.org/pregnant-women-in-ontario-are-now-eligible-for-covid-19-vaccines/ CBC ‘More and more people understand’: travelers who use the Canada-U.S. Land border to avoid quarantine hotels Greg Peacock crossed the Rainbow Bridge in Niagara Falls, Ontario, and returned to Canada with his three puppies in hand, stopping to take selfies, but he didn’t cross here for the view. He chose this point of entry […]]]>


CBC

‘More and more people understand’: travelers who use the Canada-U.S. Land border to avoid quarantine hotels

Greg Peacock crossed the Rainbow Bridge in Niagara Falls, Ontario, and returned to Canada with his three puppies in hand, stopping to take selfies, but he didn’t cross here for the view. He chose this point of entry from the United States to avoid the mandatory three-day stay in a quarantine hotel that applies to air travelers entering Canada. “I don’t want to spend three days or anything locked in a hotel when I’m back in Toronto for work,” he said. He is one of many Canadians who go to US airports near the Canada-US border and cross on foot or hire car services to drive them to avoid staying in the quarantine hotels required for travelers. aerial. Instead of flying directly to Toronto’s Pearson International Airport, Peacock flew from Los Angeles to Buffalo, NY, took a cab to the border, entered Canada, and took the train to Toronto. “It takes a little longer, but it’s an adventure,” he said. Peacock told CBC News he will be quarantined after returning home. Since the three-day hotel quarantine rule came into effect in February, Peacock has crossed the Canadian border twice on his way home from Los Angeles, where his wife lives. (Greg Peacock) Almost 20,000 land crossings since February 21. Across the Border is neither new nor illegal, but it violates non-essential travel advice and allows travelers to avoid staying in one of the federally sanctioned quarantine hotels which can be costly. up to $ 2,000 for a three day stay – a requirement for these. arriving by plane. The temporary measures and the closure of the Canada-U.S. Land border, which came into effect in March 2020, have both been extended until May 21. Peacock is not alone. Since the hotel rules came into effect on February 21, nearly 20,000 people have crossed the border by land (not including essential workers), according to CBC News analysis of figures provided by the Border Services Agency. of Canada (CBSA). Whether Canadians return by land or air, if they are not essential workers or otherwise exempted, under federal guidelines, they must quarantine for 14 days, with air travelers spending the first three days in a hotel until ‘until they get the result of a COVID-19 test. Ground travelers should proceed directly to their quarantine destination after crossing the border. Special rules for snowbirds? Scott and Caryl Rutledge of Toronto chose to fly to Buffalo Niagara International Airport and hire a limo to take them across the border rather than returning home from Tampa, Florida, where they have property and have spent the last two months. We showed up with negative COVID tests, ”Scott Rutledge told CBC News as he and his wife sat in the back of the limo on the Canadian side of the Rainbow Bridge in Niagara Falls. “We believe ourselves to be 100% healthy when it comes to COVID, and so everything else was unnecessary duplication. It’s overkill in the extreme, at least as far as it applies to us.” The couple paid about C $ 350 for the trip from the Buffalo airport, plus US $ 200 each for their COVID-19 tests. Scott and Caryl Rutledge return to Canada after spending two months in Tampa, Florida, where they own. The Toronto couple hired a limousine service to bring them back from the Buffalo airport to their home. They both received a COVID-19 vaccine in Florida. (Laura Clementson / CBC) They said there should be different rules for snowbirds like them. “I think there should have been two entry levels: one for snowbirds – vaccinated people who have been gone for more than months – and … different rules maybe for people who have gone on vacation. for two weeks. thing different, ”said Caryl Rutledge. Although land borders are closed to non-essential travel, all Canadian citizens have the right to enter Canada. But like air travelers, they must show a negative COVID-19 test carried out within 72 hours of arriving at the border and have a quarantine plan. For those traveling from overseas via the United States, a negative test must be presented upon arrival in the United States, according to the United States government, and again at the land border upon entering Canada. Travelers also receive a take-home test to take on the 10th day of their return. There are no exemptions for those who have already been vaccinated. Once the pedestrians enter Canada, they are escorted into a tent, pictured here at the Rainbow Bridge in Niagara Falls. There they are reviewed and briefed on COVID-19 protocols. (Greg Bruce / CBC) Local authorities monitor quarantine compliance The CBSA told CBC News it does not track Canadians returning home after being vaccinated against COVID-19 abroad. But the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is keeping track of travelers who have tested positive for COVID-19. From February 22 to April 18, the agency told CBC News it received 50,905 test results from land travelers on the day they arrived in Canada. Of these, 128 tested positive for COVID-19, for a positivity rate of 0.25%. During the same period for air travelers, the agency received 144,177 test results, of which 2,541 – or 1.76% – were positive for COVID-19, PHAC said. The agency also monitors quarantine compliance for air and ground travelers with the help of local law enforcement agencies, the RCMP and third-party security companies. Between February 21 and April 19, more than 111,000 air travelers and 43,000 ground travelers received a third-party compliance verification visit, according to PHAC. And during the same period, RCMP and local law enforcement agencies tracked 13,500 air travelers and 5,900 ground travelers – 95% of whom were found to be in compliance with quarantine orders. Prices for flights to Buffalo are rising In an email to CBC News, Canada’s public health agency said “compliance with border measures is high.” CBC News asked Health Canada for advice on why people traveling by air are forced to go to a hotel while those entering the country by land are not, but have not been granted access. direct response. Health Canada said in an email that “the Government of Canada is continually evaluating the effects of border measures.” Land border crossings could attract more attention in light of Canada’s decision on Thursday to ban passenger flights from India and Pakistan for 30 days in response to rising COVID cases -19 and the spread of new variants. Airlines also seem to have understood the loophole at the land border. Prices for flights to Buffalo from popular snowbird destinations like Tampa, Orlando, Florida, Phoenix, Arizona and Los Angeles have all been on the rise since the quarantine hotel rules took effect in Canada. “I felt pretty smart at first, but apparently more people get it,” said Peacock, who travels back and forth monthly to be with his wife in Los Angeles. “Flights to Buffalo were crowded. Prices are going up.” WATCH | How Some Canadians Bypass Quarantine Rules for Air Travelers: Auto Services Record Stable Business Ground transportation services are also boosted. About 30 kilometers from the Rainbow Bridge at the Peace Bridge in Fort Erie, Ont., Bethea Reznik is sitting in her van in the parking lot closest to the border. She reads while waiting for a Canadian passenger to be dropped off by an American auto service. She will then drive the Canadian to Toronto. Bethea Reznik, who has a private car service, picks up passengers from a parking lot closest to the US border after they are dropped off by a US taxi. Reznik says she makes about two round trips from Toronto each week. (Greg Bruce / CBC) American bus and taxi drivers are seen as essential service providers, allowing them to get Canadians across the border. “I’ve been very busy,” she said of her own business. “I’m just trying to help people as much as I can.” Reznik said she makes about two round trips from Toronto per week. She said she felt for her passengers who are affected by the extra steps now required to get to where they want to go. Parked near Reznik’s van, Alison Noble waits for her son, Eric Noble-Marks, to be dropped off by an American cab. The Boston law student was on his way home to Toronto. Noble-Marks said he was vaccinated, but given the limited information on the ability to transmit the virus after vaccination, he opted for a land crossing as it seemed safer than flying. Eric Noble-Marks, a Boston law student from Toronto, took an American cab across the border to a parking lot near the Peace Bridge in Fort Erie, Ont., Where his mother was waiting for him to take him home (Laura Clementson / CBC) “I wanted to do something where I minimized the change of hands as much as possible,” he said. He plans to quarantine at home with his mother, he said. Noble-Marks said he was not opposed to requiring travelers to stay in a quarantine hotel if it helped slow the spread of COVID-19, but it should not have a cost. “It’s one thing to stay in a hotel for a few days. It’s another thing to be on the spot,” he said. “I was not going to a hotel” For some travelers who spoke to CBC News, avoiding a hotel stay was not a matter of cost, but of health. Betty Bennett, who winters in Arizona, took an American car service from Buffalo Airport to her home in Orillia, Ont., Because she insisted on going straight home. “I would not go to any meeting place after hearing what happened with the nursing homes,” she said. “So there wasn’t even a choice for me … I didn’t go to a hotel.” PHAC told CBC News that as of April 18, 45,194 hotel rooms have been booked in government-authorized accommodations using the Global Business System, which does not include rooms that travelers have booked directly with hotels. Each of these reservations may include multiple rooms and / or guests. The majority of rooms were booked in Toronto with 26,454, followed by Vancouver with 10,921. About 49,000 air travelers, or 11% of the total, were exempted from staying in a hotel. Regarding fines for those who avoid a hotel stay, PHAC told CBC News that as of April 19, it was aware of 404 tickets given to travelers who did not book a hotel or refused to stay there. The fine for refusing to go to the hotel is $ 3,000.



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CEO offers 12-week course to attract more women to tech jobs https://feminaust.org/ceo-offers-12-week-course-to-attract-more-women-to-tech-jobs/ https://feminaust.org/ceo-offers-12-week-course-to-attract-more-women-to-tech-jobs/#respond Thu, 22 Apr 2021 11:16:15 +0000 https://feminaust.org/ceo-offers-12-week-course-to-attract-more-women-to-tech-jobs/ Few companies promise to hire people after they register for their courses, especially during a pandemic, but that’s exactly what Amy Golding, founder of _nology, says she will do. The no-frills businesswoman who is also CEO of tech recruiting firm Opus Talent Solutions says Right now, 85% of people working in tech are white males. […]]]>


Few companies promise to hire people after they register for their courses, especially during a pandemic, but that’s exactly what Amy Golding, founder of _nology, says she will do.

The no-frills businesswoman who is also CEO of tech recruiting firm Opus Talent Solutions says Right now, 85% of people working in tech are white males. Rather than wait for someone to fix the problem, I thought I didn’t care, I would try.

The course launched by _nology offers a new way to access a technological career for people without coding experience, in just 12 weeks. Through its software development course, they can enter the workplace as junior software developers. At the end of the _nology course, the newly qualified junior developers are then placed in jobs by Opus. The company is headquartered in Bristol and has offices around the world, as well as more than 2,000 customers including Uber, Burberry, GE and Bank of America.

Amy says: We called it _nology to eliminate the fear of “ tech ” for those with no tech background. You don’t need to be a technician to enter this industry. Our course is not only for women. It’s about diversity, but it tries to encompass diversity in all its forms. The problem we are trying to solve is an economic and social problem.

The 12 week course is delivered online and costs £ 6,975 including an initial deposit of £ 1,200. No coding experience is needed to start the course, in fact a third of trainees have no degree at all. Students will be trained by the best coaches in the business and equipped with the latest technical skills in HTML, CSS, JavaScript, React, Node.js, GIT and other foundational skills, making them ready for use. . junior developers.

She explains Salaries for technicians are about 30 percent higher than general salaries. The growth trajectory in technology is also very fast in terms of promotion. It’s as if everything depends on market forces and the demand for developers is currently outweighing the supply.

Amy is not from a technical background, she says from a personal point of view, I did an English degree and I am absolutely not technical in my opinion. If anyone had told me that I would make a living running a £ 100million company entirely focused on tech skills, I would have laughed in my face.

She ignores any potential criticism she might receive for focusing her efforts on women and minorities, stressing that this is something companies will benefit in the end. Amy says The reality is that diversity is not a human resource issue, it is a business issue. Businesses are realizing this. It’s not about doing nice things for women and minorities, it’s about companies being stronger and making more money when their employee base represents their customer base.

Source: This money



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New report suggests gender pay gap for doctors has widened during pandemic https://feminaust.org/new-report-suggests-gender-pay-gap-for-doctors-has-widened-during-pandemic/ https://feminaust.org/new-report-suggests-gender-pay-gap-for-doctors-has-widened-during-pandemic/#respond Thu, 22 Apr 2021 08:40:45 +0000 https://feminaust.org/new-report-suggests-gender-pay-gap-for-doctors-has-widened-during-pandemic/ A new report suggests that the gender pay gap for doctors has grown during the pandemic, with female doctors being disproportionately affected by declining incomes. The Medscape UK 2021 Physician Salary and Sanctification Survey, conducted between November 10, 2020 and February 16, 2021, includes responses from more than 1,000 physicians in England, Scotland, Wales and […]]]>


A new report suggests that the gender pay gap for doctors has grown during the pandemic, with female doctors being disproportionately affected by declining incomes.

The Medscape UK 2021 Physician Salary and Sanctification Survey, conducted between November 10, 2020 and February 16, 2021, includes responses from more than 1,000 physicians in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. North.

This includes doctors from a range of specialties, with 73% working in the NHS, 23% working both in the NHS and the private sector and 4% in the private sector only.

The report examines changes in average physician salaries since Medscape’s last Salary and Satisfaction Survey released in 2019.

It found that overall, 29% of British doctors reported a drop in their income, down from 17% in 2019. Some doctors attributed the drop in income to COVID-19 “several times”, while others cited different reasons.

The report also suggests that women experienced a greater reduction in their income, with female physicians reporting a 10% reduction in their income on average, double that reported by male physicians.

This has resulted in an increase in the gender pay gap from £ 32,000 in 2018 to £ 35,000 currently, according to Medscape.

This translated into satisfaction with pay for the respective genders, with more female physicians – 67% – feeling under-rewarded for their work compared to 59% of male physicians.

In addition, the report found that the average pay gap between GPs and specialists has also grown, with GPs reporting an average drop of £ 12,000 to £ 92,000 compared to specialists, who reported a average drop from £ 9,000 to £ 105,000.

Looking across generations, the highest salary dissatisfaction was reported by millennials – 74% – compared to millennials – 74% – and baby boomers – 50%.



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Authors explore obstacles Latin teachers face in higher education | Way of life https://feminaust.org/authors-explore-obstacles-latin-teachers-face-in-higher-education-way-of-life/ https://feminaust.org/authors-explore-obstacles-latin-teachers-face-in-higher-education-way-of-life/#respond Thu, 22 Apr 2021 03:05:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/authors-explore-obstacles-latin-teachers-face-in-higher-education-way-of-life/ Patricia Perez and Estela Zarate discussed the findings of the book, “The Tenure-Track Process for Chicana and Latina Faculties: Experiences of Resistance and Persistence at the Academy,” on April 20. (Screenshot / Daily Titan) (Screenshot / Daily Titan) The Pollak Library continued to host its midday talks with Prof. Patricia Perez and Estela Zarate and […]]]>






Patricia Perez and Estela Zarate discussed the findings of the book, “The Tenure-Track Process for Chicana and Latina Faculties: Experiences of Resistance and Persistence at the Academy,” on April 20. (Screenshot / Daily Titan)



The Pollak Library continued to host its midday talks with Prof. Patricia Perez and Estela Zarate and discussed the concluding findings of the book, “The Tenure-Track Process for Chicana and Latina Faculty: Experiences of Resistance and Persistence at the academy ”, Tuesday.

The webinar shared insight into the struggles that Chicana and Latina facing the faculty, how to facilitate retention and promotion, the importance of their voice as well as the importance of their role as female mentors.

According to Perez, Much of the inspiration for the book came from two earlier books by Kerry Ann Rockquemore and Tracey Laszloffy titled, “The Black Academic’s Guide to Winning the Mandate ー Without Losing Your Soul” and “Presumed Incompetent: Intersections of race and class for women in academia. ”

Perez also stated that tThe goal of the conversation was to allow participants to come away with a better understanding of the Chicana and Latinas landscape in the higher education system in the United States and how to support the Chicana and Latina faculties.

Because the book was published in 2019, before the United States was affected by the pandemic, it does not cover the current struggles the Chicana and Latina community have faced since. In an infographic created by HOPE, the COVID Tracking Project, it was stated that in California, nearly 30% of all Latinas and almost 40% of undocumented Latinas lost their jobs in the first months of the pandemic. .

Tthe infographic also showed that in California, 15% of Latinas had at least a bachelor’s degree compared to 43% of white women, and Latinas in California earned $ 0.42 for every dollar earned by a white man.

To talk about the educational conditions that teachers in Latina and Chicana face, another infographic shared in the onine seminar showed statistics of full-time teachers by race, sex and academic rank, provided by the National Statistics Center of the education, also known as NCES. He revealed that the Hispanic faculty, both female and male, is only 3%, which is similar to black faculty. In comparison, white women make up 55% of the entire faculty and white men 40%.

As professors move up the ranks, data shows that fewer Hispanic professors progress alongside their white counterparts, so institutions end up with 1% or less at full professor rank.

Looking more closely at the data provided by the NCES, the ranking of Caucasian male faculty is the most evenly distributed relative to their female counterparts, while they are concentrated at the assistant professor level. Hispanic teachers level early at the teacher and instructor level and decline as they progress through the ranks.

Perez said factors contributing to this data are that women are seen as less competent, rated lower in teaching evaluations, their research is cited less, and they have lower salaries. According to Perez, women in general are more engaged in service and spend more time counseling and coaching.They also have a higher proportion of home care responsibilities, Perez said.

“For women, and especially Hispanic women, women in general are seen as less competent. They are rated lower in teaching evaluations. Their research is less cited. They have lower wages than men. Thus, women in general are more engaged in service and spend more time with students, whether it is counseling, mentoring and unfortunately this continues at home and especially for those with leadership responsibilities. caregivers, ”Perez said.

In addition to their existing challenges, the women of Chicana and Latina also face gender and ethnic stereotypes that they are nurturing, motherly and submissive, Perez said. When they do not correspond to these particular expectations, it can result in prejudices and negative pedagogical evaluations.

In one of the chapters in the book, research shows how Latin leaders such as professors and administrators often receive challenges at their scholarship, simply for the way they are, and receive direct challenges to their authority. Their accomplishments are also often downplayed.

“Research also reports that Chicanas and Latinas find themselves undervalued, emotionally taxed, poorly paid, under-supervised, overworked, especially when it comes to service. Thus, Chicana and Latina faculties face both this cultural tax and the gender tax and therefore Latinas and other women of color in the faculty have higher service charges and mentoring charges and more important advice. So their service obviously has an impact on their ability to write research, to hone their teaching profession, it means that retention and promotion are hampered, ”said Perez.

the The Pollak Library Lecture Series continues on April 27 with Tala Khanmalek and his presentation on “The Bath Riots of 1917: Uncovering the History of Public Health in the United States and Mexico.”

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Women school leaders are paid less than men. It’s a big concern https://feminaust.org/women-school-leaders-are-paid-less-than-men-its-a-big-concern/ https://feminaust.org/women-school-leaders-are-paid-less-than-men-its-a-big-concern/#respond Thu, 22 Apr 2021 00:30:53 +0000 https://feminaust.org/women-school-leaders-are-paid-less-than-men-its-a-big-concern/ Female principals earn about $ 1,000 less than their male colleagues each year, new research on principals’ pay – and this gap can persist even when these women run similar schools, do evaluations similar and work roughly the same number of hours as their male counterparts. . But what drives this pay gap in school […]]]>


Female principals earn about $ 1,000 less than their male colleagues each year, new research on principals’ pay – and this gap can persist even when these women run similar schools, do evaluations similar and work roughly the same number of hours as their male counterparts. .

But what drives this pay gap in school leadership is not so clear. While the factors underlying wage differences in the private sector – discrimination and personal choice, for example – may explain some of the differences, not all of them, said Jason Grissom, professor of public policy and education at Vanderbilt University.

Grissom is the lead author of Unequal Pay for Equal Work? Explain the gender gap in main pay ”, which was published this month in the Economics of Education Review.

Wage disparities can have huge implications for the profession if left unaddressed and could lead to difficulties in recruiting women for senior school leadership if women feel they are not being paid fairly. , or to women who leave the profession early, said Grissom.

And that kind of turnover is not good for students or staff. Previous research by Grissom and others has shown that primary turnover has a negative impact on both staff and students and has financial consequences for districts. who invest in the main preparation.

In addition, “there is a basic equity problem, even if there are no political consequences,” he said. “You have to be concerned about any case where it seems like workers are being treated differently, [and] their pay is different depending on a character such as gender, ethnicity, race, etc.

Women school leaders are both underrepresented and underpaid

While the percentage of women in school leadership has increased, women still represent a lower percentage of principals than in teaching staff. Women make up almost 80 percent of teachers, but just over half of principals.

“There is a representation gap, and factors like compensation could be contributing to it,” Grissom said. “This could be an obstacle to increasing the representation of women in the labor market.”

Grissom and her colleagues – Jennifer D. Timmer, Jennifer L. Nelson, and Richard SL Blissett – looked at key Missouri data from 1991 to 2016 to find out if there was a gender pay gap in management; how it has changed over time; and whether factors such as education, the type of school run by the principal or other characteristics that may explain the difference in salary.

The other possibility here is that there is discrimination when districts exercise their discretion over compensation offers; that women lose.

Jason Grissom, Professor of Public Policy and Education, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University

In addition to data from Missouri, the researchers drew on data from the National Center for Education Statistics’s School and Staff Survey for the years 1999-2000 and 2011-2012, as well as a sample survey of the 2015-2016 National Teacher and Principal Survey, when principals reported their wages before taxes.

Analysis of data from Missouri found that the gender pay gap had grown from an average of around $ 4,000 in 1991 to around $ 300 in 2005. But it had grown to around $ 3,000 by 2013. in 2016 (Women actually had a slight advantage during The Great Recession, they found.) Overall, the researchers found that female principals in the state earned about $ 1,450 less per year than male managers during the period studied.

And using national data, Grissom and his colleagues found that, on average, male managers earn $ 1,000 more than their female colleagues each year.

Is discretion in setting wages the culprit?

What is behind this disparity?

Men were already paid better as deputy managers, so it was likely that they would earn more than women when they entered management, theorized Grissom and his colleagues. Men were also more likely to run secondary schools, where principals generally earn more than those who run elementary schools.

And they also tended to earn more as teachers, through extra pay, like coaching sports or taking leadership roles. One possibility was that when districts hired men, they added incentives to compensate them for the income they would lose by forgoing training or other duties.

But when Grissom and his colleagues dug deeper, they found that these factors didn’t fully explain the difference. Even when men and women with the same level of experience run similar schools (e.g. high schools), the gap persists.

The normal dynamics of the labor market – with men more willing to move for a job and therefore to obtain increases for doing so – do not seem to hold true for managers. Neither the longer working hours, nor the higher education levels or quality, said Grissom. (Women school leaders tend to have a higher level of education.)

“We can say he’s not one of the usual suspects,” Grissom said. But the study “doesn’t tell us what it is. Of course, there is the possibility that there is discrimination in the setting of wages. But there are also possibilities which we cannot rule out, but which we cannot observe.

The researchers found that the pay gap existed even when districts had salary scales for directors.

This means that districts still have a lot of leeway to offer incentives, and these tend to favor men more than women.

“Even when there is a schedule, districts don’t have to follow it to the letter,” said Grissom.

It could be that men negotiate differently and thus get higher wages, he said.

“But the other possibility here is that there is discrimination when districts exercise their discretion over compensation offers; that women lose, ”he said. “I think the first step is to recognize that these gaps exist, and then the question is what is the right approach to address the fact that although in percentage terms it looks like the gaps are small, .. in absolute value, the differences count. The difference of $ 1,400 “is not trivial for someone’s paycheque.”

Grissom said future exploration of what drives the gender pay gap, what those gaps look like in other states, and how pay affects measured outcomes – like leadership turnover and satisfaction. at work – can lead to a better understanding of the problem.



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Why nursing in Denmark pays less than male dominated professions https://feminaust.org/why-nursing-in-denmark-pays-less-than-male-dominated-professions/ https://feminaust.org/why-nursing-in-denmark-pays-less-than-male-dominated-professions/#respond Wed, 21 Apr 2021 10:33:02 +0000 https://feminaust.org/why-nursing-in-denmark-pays-less-than-male-dominated-professions/ The pay gap between men and women and the measures to be taken to remedy it in Denmark have recently come to a head in the nursing profession. During the pandemic, the focus on the work of nurses has emerged in a number of countries, including the UK where a recent proposal to a 1% […]]]>


The pay gap between men and women and the measures to be taken to remedy it in Denmark have recently come to a head in the nursing profession. During the pandemic, the focus on the work of nurses has emerged in a number of countries, including the UK where a recent proposal to a 1% salary increase has been heavily criticized.

In national public sector negotiations in Denmark, nurses voted against a recent pay offer of up to 5%, which was to preserve Real wages for civil servants over the next three years. But Studies show that it is not only a question of a salary increase: the salary level itself is set unfairly low for those who form part of the profession. And the root of the problem goes back to a law that came into effect some 50 years ago.

Denmark has a global reputation for equality, but he still has problems with unequal pay. Danish nurses always receive 10% to 20% less paid than male-dominated occupations requiring a similar level of education. There is many contributing factors unequal wages, but a recent report of the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR) found that legislation enacted in 1969 drove nurses and other female-dominated professions to a lower level of pay.

Not only was the recent payroll offer rejected, a citizens’ petition reforming the law with respect to many traditionally female professions received the 50,000 signatures needed, in a record time of eight days, to get to parliament.

Structural sexism

At the heart of the current struggle for equal pay in Denmark is the call for the Danish parliament to review the Civil Service Reform Act 1969. The law aimed to modernize the employment system for state employees and allow the state to better control salary increases. This law is considered to be one of the main reasons why female-dominated professions in the public sector still have lower wages than their male counterparts in positions with a corresponding level of education and responsibility.

In 1965, a commission was appointed to collect data and evaluate all the functions of the post, as officials wanted to build a salary scale and terms based solely on objective criteria. However, collecting such a large and diverse amount of data turned out to be more difficult than expected.

The committee was also unable to decide what criteria to use to classify the different occupational groups and exactly how they should be weighted against each other. In a letter sent to all government departments, the commission mentioned workload, education and responsibility as criteria for evaluating work, but never succeeded in developing an appropriate system.

The commission was also instructed not to significantly increase public wage spending. He therefore had to maintain the existing status quo, limiting the number of professional groups that could be moved to a higher salary bracket. The status quo at this time dated back to the first Civil Service Act of 1919, and the commission had little room for maneuver: raising the wages of one occupational group would lead to demands from others.

Protesters for equal pay gather in a square with red banners.
Foran Christiansborg

Although its aim was to ultimately modernize the commission final proposal – which became law – perpetuated a system that went back much further in time. In this context, predominantly female professions were generally placed at a lower level in relation to their training and level of responsibility at the time.

The law provided that the rest of the public sector would have to synchronize their wages with the new system, and this pay gap eventually spread to all other types of public workers. It also provided the state with a relatively high degree of control over wages in the public sector.

Public pay scales today

In December 2020, the DIHR report examined the relationship between the salary scales of civil servants in 1969 and 2019 and found an overall correlation, demonstrating similar pay gaps today as there were then.

This would not be a problem in itself if the differences in pay between professions initially appeared to be valid and remain so. To determine whether the 1969 and 2019 pay scales were unfavorable to female-dominated occupations, education levels were analyzed. The report found that female-dominated occupations in 1969 were, in general, ranked lower than one might expect based on the corresponding length of schooling, while male-dominated occupations were better placed.

The same trend could be seen in 2019 but, perhaps surprisingly, there was even less correlation between education level and position on the pay scale.

Political action

While the pay gap compared to the 1969 law and equal pay in general have been on the agenda for many years in Denmark, the report has sparked renewed public and political interest in recent weeks. What must be done to resolve a wage gap resulting from a law passed over 50 years ago?

COVID has in Denmark, as elsewhere, highlighted care work as an essential part of society’s infrastructure, creating support and momentum for equal pay activists. The citizens’ petition calls for the repeal of the 1969 law and the introduction of equal pay for all public professional groups.

Long-standing concerns about compensation claims (if the wages of one profession are raised, another group will demand the same) must be overcome – and there is only one pot where they all come from. public sector wages, set by the government.

Politicians have so far tried to shirk responsibility by suggesting that the common method of resolving industrial disputes in Denmark should be used, namely collective bargaining between unions and employers’ federations (which the so-called “social partners”). However, the message from nurses and other care professions is loud and clear: It is up to politicians to do something about an outdated law that has unwittingly echoed through the ages.

This article is co-published with Nordics.info



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Gender pay gap widens as female doctors earn less amid COVID-19 pandemic https://feminaust.org/gender-pay-gap-widens-as-female-doctors-earn-less-amid-covid-19-pandemic/ https://feminaust.org/gender-pay-gap-widens-as-female-doctors-earn-less-amid-covid-19-pandemic/#respond Wed, 21 Apr 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/gender-pay-gap-widens-as-female-doctors-earn-less-amid-covid-19-pandemic/ New Medscape report found pay inequality widened in 2020, with female doctors paying 30% less than their male counterparts The survey also found that over 60% of doctors felt under-rewarded and 40% would not choose medicine as a career if they could start over. LONDON, April 21, 2021 / PRNewswire / – As the UK […]]]>


New Medscape report found pay inequality widened in 2020, with female doctors paying 30% less than their male counterparts

The survey also found that over 60% of doctors felt under-rewarded and 40% would not choose medicine as a career if they could start over.

LONDON, April 21, 2021 / PRNewswire / – As the UK begins to see progress against the COVID-19 pandemic, the unprecedented impact and pressure on NHS staff and doctors is being fully assessed. A new report from Medscape finds that the overall average earnings of British doctors have fallen since the last report, and that female doctors have been disproportionately affected with a larger pay cut than their male counterparts. More than 60% of doctors feel under-rewarded in terms of salary, according to the survey.

Medscape UK 2021 Physician Salary and Satisfaction Survey presents the responses of more than 1000 physicians in England, Scotland, Wales and North Ireland. Doctors of all specialties were included in the survey, the majority working in the NHS (73%), almost a quarter (23%) working both in the NHS and the private sector and 4% in the sector private only. The report examines the evolution of average physician salaries since Medscape’s last Salary and Satisfaction Survey released in 2019.

Overall, 29% of UK doctors said their incomes had declined, up from 17% in 2018. When doctors were asked about the reasons for their declining incomes, the COVID-19 pandemic was mentioned to many times. Others cited different reasons, with one respondent saying: ‘Rising cost of living and frankly poor treatment of the entire medical profession by the government ‘.

The gender pay gap widens for doctors
The survey, conducted between November 10, 2020 at February 16, 2021suggests that the gender pay gap has widened during the pandemic, with women experiencing a greater reduction in their earnings. Female doctors reported a 10% reduction in their earnings on average, which was double that reported by male doctors, and led to an increase in the gender pay gap of £ 32,000 in 2018 at £ 35,000 currently.

The average pay gap between GPs and specialists has also widened, with GPs reporting an average drop of £ 12,000 to £ 92,000 compared to specialists reporting an average drop of £ 9,000 at £ 105,000. This increase in the pay gap is reflected in the way in which everyone is rewarded for their work, as 66% of general practitioners feel under-rewarded while this figure is 61% for specialists. However, 34% of doctors reported an increase in their income with career progression and improvement in private practice due to NHS closures among the common reasons cited.

Undervalued and underrewarded
The increase in the gender pay gap likely affected satisfaction with pay for the respective genders, as more female physicians (67%) felt underrewarded for their work than male physicians. (59%). When asked if they were happy to be a doctor, one in five said no, and twice as many (40%) said they would not choose medicine as a career if they had to start over. . ‘Stop clapping, pay us’ was a common theme among respondents, with a large proportion of doctors (83%) saying working in the NHS has become more difficult since the pandemic.

Across generations, salary dissatisfaction was higher among millennials (74%) than millennials (63%) and baby boomers (50%). When asked what the biggest frustration with working in the NHS is, responses included:

  • Applause is considered a fair payment for working in a pandemic ”
  • ‘Intimidation’
  • Brainless and brainless managers
  • ‘Burnout’

For more results, see the full Medscape report: http://medscape.com/uk-salary-report-2021

Methodology of the report

Physicians who are members of Medscape and Univadis were invited to participate in an online salary and satisfaction survey. Respondents had to be practicing British doctors. 1025 doctors met the criteria and responded to the survey. Data collection period – November 10, 2020February 16, 2021. The survey’s margin of error was a 95% confidence level using a 50% point estimate.

About Medscape

Medscape is the premier source for clinical news, health information, and point-of-care tools for healthcare professionals. Medscape provides the most robust and integrated medical information and educational tools for specialists, primary care physicians and other healthcare professionals. Medscape Education (medscape.org) is the premier destination for continuing professional development, comprised of over 30 specialty destinations offering thousands of free CME and CE courses and other educational programs for physicians, nurses and other professionals of health. Medscape is a subsidiary of WebMD Health Corp.

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Addressing the gender gap in Japan https://feminaust.org/addressing-the-gender-gap-in-japan/ https://feminaust.org/addressing-the-gender-gap-in-japan/#respond Wed, 21 Apr 2021 04:07:45 +0000 https://feminaust.org/addressing-the-gender-gap-in-japan/ Japan, the world’s third-largest economy, faces two challenges: a lack of female participation in the overall workforce, especially in the senior ranks, and an aging population. In the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report 2020, Japan ranked 121st (out of 153), in part due to the lack of women in leadership and management positions. […]]]>


Japan, the world’s third-largest economy, faces two challenges: a lack of female participation in the overall workforce, especially in the senior ranks, and an aging population. In the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report 2020, Japan ranked 121st (out of 153), in part due to the lack of women in leadership and management positions. The rapid aging of Japanese society exacerbates the problem. Last year, the country’s population declined for the ninth year in a row – and those over 65 now make up 28.4% of the total population.

Before the pandemic, Japan was taking steps to reconsider its long-standing reluctance to recruit foreign labor. But part of the solution to Japan’s demographic problems is to encourage more women to participate in the workforce – and to participate more fully. Like Bbad Emmott said so in these pages in 2019, Japan must build a “much more feminine future”.

Kathy Matsui, a former vice president of Goldman Sachs who retired last year, was one of the first people in Japan to recognize that increasing female employment could offset Japan’s demographic challenges. . Matsui was born in California in 1965 to parents who had emigrated from Japan. After attending Harvard University, she first visited Japan in 1986. Eight years later, in 1994, she joined Goldman Sachs Japan. In 1999, while working as a strategist for Goldman Sachs, Matsui wrote an article titled “Womenomics. In 2013, the report was transformed into official Japanese economic policy by then Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

The main objectives of this policy were to employ more women and to ensure that women occupy at least 30 percent of managerial and managerial positions. In a recent interview, Matsui says she believes Japan has succeeded in shifting gender diversity out of the realm of human rights and equality into the realm of business and economic growth.

Attracting women out of economic necessity, Matsui said, was a stepping stone to discussing gender diversity more openly – in Japanese businesses and among the general population. “The biggest obstacle or stumbling block from my perspective has always been this mindset obstacle: getting people to care about gender diversity. Changing this context was a very important first step. “

There has been progress. After former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe began more actively promoting gender diversity at the start of his term seven years ago, the female participation rate (the percentage of women aged 15-64 who are employees) increased from 56% to 72%. That’s an increase of about 3 million women. “It’s higher than where I’m from – the US – as well as the EU,” Matsui says. This growth has been made possible, primarily, by policy changes. For example, Japan has one of the most generous parental leave systems in the world. (Mothers and fathers are entitled to one year of parental leave, during which their pay equals 60 to 80 percent of their salary before the leave.) More surprisingly, parents can take parental leave until their first birthday. their child. “Of course, all women take it and not enough men, but the system itself is extraordinarily generous,” notes Matsui.

However, the government has had much less success in strengthening female leadership in the corporate world. Last year, the government acknowledged that it needed to push back its target of 30% of leadership positions – between corporate leadership positions and CEOs – held by women from 2020 to 2030. “They should have been. at least explain more clearly Why they didn’t achieve their goal, ”says Matsui, who criticizes vague ambitions. “What were the obstacles? What is the roadmap to reach the goal? What concrete steps are they taking? It is not enough to turn off a target or delay it. “

Currently, women make up less than 10% of all business presidents in Japan. A study by the Teikoku 2020 database found that out of 1.2 million Japanese companies, only 8% had female presidents, which is still 3.5 percentage points more than in 1990.

One of the reasons why so few women advance to managerial positions is their overrepresentation in irregular work, known in Japanese as Hiseiki. Almost half of all female workers have such hiseiki contracts, which pay lower wages and generally offer fewer opportunities to advance their careers than full-time positions. In contrast, only a quarter of all working men have this type of contract. According to the Ministry of the Interior and Communications, an astonishing 970,000 irregular jobs have been lost directly or indirectly as a result of the pandemic; 700,000 of these jobs were held by women.

An astonishing 970,000 irregular jobs in Japan have been lost directly or indirectly as a result of the pandemic; 700,000 of these jobs were held by women.

So how can Japan evolve into a society “where women can shine,” as former Prime Minister Abe said? Matsui argues that it is vital to reconsider the current rating system in Japanese companies. “The key measure for evaluating performance is time. I like to call it “face time”. Men, who are the primary breadwinners in many Japanese families, often work for organizations that have time or seniority as a key metric to assess performance, ”says Matsui. This encourages men to spend as much time as possible at work, leaving women to take care of the family. “The main reason women leave work is childbirth combined with a lack of child care.”

Matsui argues that Japanese companies need to move towards a performance-based assessment approach. And it is possible that the pandemic will provide momentum in that direction. The shift to remote work could force companies to stop promoting overtime and put more emphasis on production. Or as Benjamin Cordier, Managing Director of RGF Professional Recruitment Japan, mentionned last year about such a change: “It could level the playing field for men and women in the workplace.”

Matsui points out, however, that the Japanese government has effectively removed some of the barriers that traditionally prevented women from rising through the ranks in Japanese companies. The corporate governance code, introduced in 2015 and reformed in 2018, encourages greater diversity within boards of directors. The code states that boards should “be constituted in such a way as to ensure both diversity, including gender and international experience, and an appropriate size.” The 30% Club Japan, a diversity activism group, monitors data on gender in the country’s financial services industry and saw a 2.4% increase in the number of female directors in 2019 compared to a year earlier. This change indicates that the code prompted companies to hire more female directors.

Starting in 2016, the government required companies to make gender diversity disclosures. “The government encourages organizations to set explicit targets, such as ratios of female managers and female directors, or something similar,” notes Matsui. “The first step is always to measure.”

But she cautions that we shouldn’t be looking at the government alone. “The responsibility lies with employers and managers, because at the micro level, they are the ones who take care of promoting women and finding the best female talent,” says Matsui. The government can build child care centers, but it cannot “interfere with the inner workings of mentoring by directing their female talents.”

Twenty-two years after the publication of “Womenomics,” Matsui believes people are starting to understand the economic logic behind his article. “As a woman manager, I have spoken to many, many companies. Ultimately, the best way to convince people of the urgency of nurturing female talent is hard data and empirical analysis. If you can show that the data shows that greater diversity leads to better overall performance, human behavior will eventually follow. “According to a report written by Matsui in 2019,”Womenomics 5.0Closing the gender gap could increase GDP by 15%. Additionally, publicly traded companies with higher female executive ratios tend to offer better return on equity and higher sales growth. “I think it’s becoming clear that this is an argument based on an economic rationale as opposed to an emotional or values-based argument,” she said.

Matsui sees positive developments in gender diversity in companies around the world, noting NASDAQ recent requirement that publicly traded companies have greater diversity on the board. “All this war for talent, not just here [in Japan] but overall it means you have to create an organization with a culture that will be open to a whole range of diverse ways of thinking, ”she said. “Innovation does not come from a group of people who have the same education, the same socio-economic background or the same gender. It comes from the friction and tension that emerges when people with different perspectives come together. And that’s a competitive advantage. “

But managers still have a lot to learn to manage female talent and understand why they might decide to quit or decline a promotion. Although this is a global problem, it remains much more common in Japan than in the West. “When a woman turns down a promotion because she thinks she’s not good enough – which is very common – do you just accept it and move on or try again? I always recommend trying again. And when you ask her again, make it clear that you wouldn’t have recommended her for a position if you hadn’t believed and had full confidence that she could be successful in this new role.

The idea that women could resort to additional encouragement did not fully land in Japan. “I don’t mean to say that men don’t need that extra boost, but women need it even more, given the confidence gap which I think is pretty universal,” Matsui said. “If you think you need to fix diversity, what exactly are you supposed to do other than create a diversity committee or write a report? What exactly are you doing at this micro-level to reach and motivate your high potential female talent? This is where I see a gap.

Matsui advises ambitious young women to find a group of supporters around them. “I certainly didn’t climb the ranks of Goldman on my own. I had people who supported me, ”she says. Women in the workforce need cheerleaders, sponsors and mentors – people who can guide them. “When I was lost, it helped me a lot.”



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Top Money Expert Tips For Women https://feminaust.org/top-money-expert-tips-for-women/ https://feminaust.org/top-money-expert-tips-for-women/#respond Mon, 19 Apr 2021 11:00:43 +0000 https://feminaust.org/top-money-expert-tips-for-women/ zoranm / Getty Images When it comes to financial well-being, women tend to be at a disadvantage compared to their male counterparts. Women have lower financial literacy rates, are more likely to say they cannot afford to save for retirement, are more likely to leave the workforce to become caregivers, and generally earn less than […]]]>


zoranm / Getty Images

When it comes to financial well-being, women tend to be at a disadvantage compared to their male counterparts. Women have lower financial literacy rates, are more likely to say they cannot afford to save for retirement, are more likely to leave the workforce to become caregivers, and generally earn less than men; During this time, they have a longer life expectancy and therefore will have higher long-term costs, according to Annuity.org.

Read more: Old-fashioned money tips that you should no longer follow

While it may take some time to balance finances, women should do whatever they can to ensure that they are managing their finances well in the short and long term. Here’s What Top Money Experts Say Women Should Do to Improve Their Financial Outlook.

Discover: 10 women who marked the history of finance

Woman in her 30s filling out tax information online.

Woman in her 30s filling out tax information online.

Have a plan for the “ big three ”

Jill Schlesinger, CFP and author of the personal finance website Jill on Money, said JWI that women need to start taking their financial planning seriously in their 30s at the latest and should focus on three main areas.

“The three big issues that people need to have covered before they start planning for their future are: they need to be free from all consumer debt (no credit cards or car loans); they must have six to 12 months of spending in the bank in a secure emergency reserve fund; and they have to contribute to a pension plan, ”she said. “Once they’ve covered these big three, they can start planning for different goals in their life.”

Related: Ways to ‘celebrate’ Financial Literacy Month (which costs nothing)

Shot of two businesswomen sitting on stairs talking.

Shot of two businesswomen sitting on stairs talking.

Know your worth

One way to make sure you’re getting enough pay is to know how much other people in similar roles are making – yet women are often reluctant to discuss their salaries.

“I’m definitely advocating for women to be transparent with each other when it comes to pay,” Barbara Ginty, certified financial planner and host of the “Future Rich” podcast, told the WeWork blog. “Knowledge is power, and being able to speak openly with your close friends and colleagues – male or female – about pay can help you defend yourself better.”

Find: How to live rich on a tight budget

budget, finance and people concept - african american woman with papers and calculator counting money at home.

budget, finance and people concept – african american woman with papers and calculator counting money at home.

Be aware of the exact destination of your money

Ginty said it’s important to know exactly how much money you make and spend each month.

“Know what’s happening, where it’s going and if your spending is serving a purpose,” she said on the WeWork blog.

You can do this by looking at your bank statements, as well as your credit and debit card statements. You need to track your spending with apps, spreadsheets, or even on paper.

Lily: 8 Reasons Women Should Find A Financial Advisor Now

Thrifty woman sit at table hold pen write daily expenses in diary put coin in pink piggy bank close up.

Thrifty woman sit at table hold pen write daily expenses in diary put coin in pink piggy bank close up.

Pay yourself first

Barbara Huson, author of Secrets of Six-Figure Women, advises that in order to create wealth, women should regularly contribute a portion of what they earn to their personal savings.

“In other words, they pay each other first,” she wrote in a blog post. “I have seen countless under-earners turn small salaries into big bank balances by simply depositing small amounts into a savings account each month.”

Huson recommends setting up automatic transfers to make this tip very easy to follow.

Did you know: How Much Does a $ 100,000 Salary Go in America’s 50 Biggest Cities?

Shot of jar of coins and wads of money on desk in office.

Shot of jar of coins and wads of money on desk in office.

Aim to have $ 10,000 in emergency cash

Setting up an emergency fund can save you from going into debt if your financial situation changes unexpectedly. It should be in the form of cash that you can easily access.

“Protect your money,” Danetha Doe, founder of “Money and Mimosas” told Travel Noire. “Every woman should have access to at least $ 10,000 in cash, whether it’s in a traditional savings account or in another vehicle that you can access within 24 hours.”

Budgeting 101: How to create a budget you can live with

Shot of attractive mature businesswoman working on laptop in her workstation.

Shot of attractive mature businesswoman working on laptop in her workstation.

Create ‘buckets of money’

In addition to saving money in an emergency, you may have other financial goals you save for. Tiffany “The Budgenista” Aliche, co-host of the “Brown Ambition” podcast, said they create individual savings accounts – or “buckets of money” – for each of these goals.

“A bucket of money is just an online-only savings account that makes it easy for you to save and measure your money, like rain in a bucket,” she told MadameNoire. “The advantage of having an online-only savings account is that you can create as many categories or compartments as you want or need. I have one for my trip, one for my house, and one for a car. You could have one for birthdays, holidays and if you are a mom you could have one labeled “sports” for your kids’ activities. You can open as many savings accounts as you want and then name them so you know exactly what the money is for. “

How to get out of debt: A step-by-step guide

Roll of money for 401K with coins.

Roll of money for 401K with coins.

Maximize your tax savings accounts

Women should also prioritize saving for retirement and use tax-efficient accounts.

“Your retirement plan at work as a 401 (k) or 403 (b) and IRAs should be your first stop in building a retirement savings portfolio because unlike most other investment vehicles , these accounts provide tax benefits, “Farnoosh Torabi, host of the” So Money “Podcast, wrote in a blog post. “My company’s 401 (k) was the first investment portfolio I opened in my twenties. It not only came with a company match of 50 cents for every dollar up to 5%, I also benefited from the 401 (k) tax deduction. My contributions, up to a certain amount, have helped reduce my taxable income each year. “

Discover: Best cities to retire on a budget of $ 1,500 per month

invest in myths

invest in myths

Start investing if you haven’t already

Jully-Alma Taveras, founder of the YouTube channel “Investing Latina”, started making her educational videos to educate women about the importance of investing.

“Women have entered the workforce and are making more money than ever before – becoming financially powerful through investing is the next step,” she told the Personal Capital blog. If you’re new to investing, she said, “Start small and stay engaged. I started with $ 50 per paycheck in a 403 (b), and have now grown to manage my multi-armed investment portfolio. And that’s what I want every woman in the world to have.

Find: Richest black women in the world 2021

Young woman drinking coffee and using an ebook reader in the sofa.

Young woman drinking coffee and using an ebook reader in the sofa.

Stop making excuses

If you know you need to learn more about finances and investing, take the time to educate yourself.

“Let’s be real realistic. Women say they have to do it. It’s not about doing it. It’s about wanting to do it, ”Suze Orman, author of“ Women & Money, ”told The Associated Press. “If they wanted to do it, are you kidding me?” They can watch CNBC, read Barrons, and there are financial books galore. Read my book “Women & Money”, listen to my podcast. It’s an excuse. It’s like saying I need to lose weight – OK, so do it.

Read more: 27 Best Strategies To Get The Most Out Of Your 401 (k)

Two women at the office.

Two women at the office.

Ask for help

If you have a specific financial goal in mind and aren’t sure how to achieve it, you may want to seek help from a financial professional.

“Working with a financial planner can be a smart way to stay informed along the way and to bring in professional expertise to make sure you’re saving enough and you’re on track to achieving your goals today. ‘hui and in the future,’ Torabi said in a blog post. Publish. “To start your research, ask your friends, family and colleagues for their recommendations. The first consultations with the planners are usually free and this is an opportunity to see if working with this person would be a good solution. Look for planners with the CFP or Certified Financial Planner designation. “

More from GOBankingRates

This article was originally published on GOBankingRates.com: Top Money Expert Tips For Women



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Home of Tucson helps elite female athletes level the playing field | Lifestyles https://feminaust.org/home-of-tucson-helps-elite-female-athletes-level-the-playing-field-lifestyles/ https://feminaust.org/home-of-tucson-helps-elite-female-athletes-level-the-playing-field-lifestyles/#respond Sun, 18 Apr 2021 15:21:08 +0000 https://feminaust.org/home-of-tucson-helps-elite-female-athletes-level-the-playing-field-lifestyles/ In addition to accommodation and board, Homestretch offers its residents assistance in negotiating contracts and salaries, mentoring, job search assistance, and discounted or free services, including coaching, training, medical care, physiotherapists and rehabilitation professionals. There are also benefits for the community. Before the coronavirus, residents ran weekly rides called ‘Spin with the Stretchies’ that went […]]]>


In addition to accommodation and board, Homestretch offers its residents assistance in negotiating contracts and salaries, mentoring, job search assistance, and discounted or free services, including coaching, training, medical care, physiotherapists and rehabilitation professionals.

There are also benefits for the community.

Before the coronavirus, residents ran weekly rides called ‘Spin with the Stretchies’ that went down the street from home, at Homestretch’s sponsor, The Buzz Cafe.

The slow pace of the ride allowed residents to have conversations with local cyclists, which Bertine said the “Stretchies” and amateur cyclists greatly appreciated.

The UCI guarantees its male professionals at World Tour level a minimum annual base salary of 40,000 euros, or approximately 48,000 dollars.

Men at the Pro Continental level, or minor leagues of professional cycling, earn 30,000 euros, or $ 36,000, in wages.

The salary for professional women will be fully equal in 2023. But for now, the average salary is around $ 24,000 for women at the world tour level. Women who compete at the Pro Continental level do not have a base salary and often receive less than $ 10,000 per year.

Two-time Olympic mountain cyclist Lea Davison discovered the foundations after competing in the 2016 Summer Games, her second Olympics.



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