Feminism meaning – Feminaust http://feminaust.org/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 06:21:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://feminaust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Feminism meaning – Feminaust http://feminaust.org/ 32 32 In “Black Widow”, here’s why a simple vest with pockets means so much https://feminaust.org/in-black-widow-heres-why-a-simple-vest-with-pockets-means-so-much/ https://feminaust.org/in-black-widow-heres-why-a-simple-vest-with-pockets-means-so-much/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 23:27:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/in-black-widow-heres-why-a-simple-vest-with-pockets-means-so-much/ One scene from Marvel’s “Black Widow” prequel, which looks back at the titular superhero’s dark and humble beginnings, is particularly resonant. And in a movie full of deadly assassins, a dramatic prison break and a secret facility that explodes, the scene in question is a simple conversation between two sisters about the wonder that is […]]]>


One scene from Marvel’s “Black Widow” prequel, which looks back at the titular superhero’s dark and humble beginnings, is particularly resonant. And in a movie full of deadly assassins, a dramatic prison break and a secret facility that explodes, the scene in question is a simple conversation between two sisters about the wonder that is a waistcoat.

Separated surrogate sisters Natasha (Scarlett Johansson) and Yelena (Florence Pugh) have come together to take down the Black Widow special ops program that has kidnapped, trained, and brainwashed countless women to become machines. kill against their will. Having gone through and escaped the program themselves, they intend to free their sisters in arms. But before that, they share a surprising heart-to-heart as they take to the skies in a stolen getaway vehicle.

“You know, this is the first item of clothing I buy myself,” Yelena says casually of the waistcoat she is wearing. It’s not exactly glamorous or overtly feminine, so Natasha jokes, “Is it like an army surplus or …?”

Feeling the need to justify her purchase – and her fashion sense – Yelena says, “Okay, there are a lot of pockets, but I use them all the time and have made some of my own modifications. is that I never had control of my own life before and now I do. I want to do things. “

Natasha realizes that for Yelena the waistcoat is more than a waistcoat, and she ends up smiling and expressing her support with a simple “I love your waistcoat.” Yelena, of course, wasn’t quite done singing the garment’s praises, closing the poignant dialogue by making it clear that “you can put so much in there, you wouldn’t even know it.”

“Black Widow” is full of hard-hitting feminist stories, not the least of which is to mirror the real war on reproductive rights and validate non-biological womanhood and family. But this dialogue about Yelena’s vest is the one that’s most relevant.

Few of the women’s clothing is more universally loved than those with pockets – the more and the deeper, the better. Any woman who gets complimented on a dress that has pockets will be the first to point out this convenience with some conspiratorial glee. The simple pocket should be a no-brainer, but its absence is unfortunately the norm in women’s clothing.

As Vox reported in 2016, the pocket has always been political, offering a not-so-subtle insight into who is supposed to step out in public spaces and carry personal effects with them. This may not seem like much, since women are supposed to carry a handbag anyway, but the need to carry a handbag itself is an added burden and a gender-related cost that men don’t have to deal with. In recent years, especially throughout the skinny jeans and jeggings craze of the 2010s, the talk about the lack of pockets in women’s clothing has come to a head, as women have moved on from accepting. this lack of the wardrobe as an embarrassment to call him for his sexism.

The whole situation of Yelena’s vest is particularly political, given the context in which she has been denied control of her body and life since birth and joining the Black Widows program against her will. During her captivity, Yelena is forced to undergo an unwanted hysterectomy, kill countless people she didn’t want to kill and is denied the opportunity to have friendships and meaningful relationships with anyone. , or have a life of his own in any way. Her first free act was to buy a practical utility vest, lined with pockets that she can use not only to carry what she wants, but also to do what she wants. And what she wants is to free the other widows and be by her sister Natasha’s side.

The iconic and decidedly feminist vest is also a symbol of brotherhood – notably, the brotherhood between Yelena and Natasha. At the end of the film, Natasha accepts Yelena’s gift and wears it almost right away, from the closing scene of “Black Widow” to her return after years of on the run in “Infinity War.” The vest becomes an intimate part of her – like her brotherhood with Yelena, even when they are apart.

It is not known what happened to Yelena in the years between “Black Widow” and “Endgame”. Our only clue to this is a mid-credits scene when Yelena visits Natasha’s grave, sometime after Natasha sacrifices her life in “Endgame”. It is in this scene that Yelena is given her “next mission”, supposedly as an assassin employed by the mysterious Contessa Valentina Allegra de la Fontaine by Julia Louis-Dreyfus: to kill Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) whose life Natasha had deemed more important than her own. Understandably, being the fiery and militant feminist heroine that she is, Yelena’s response is to ask Valentina for a raise.

There is clearly a bright future for Yelena – who may well become the most sarcastic and delightfully sarcastic person in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, continuing the legacy of her sister, the first female Avenger. Hopefully, wherever her journey takes her, she’ll have reclaimed the iconic vest: a manifestation of her freedom and loving brotherhood with Natasha, the avenger who paved the way for new heroes like Yelena.



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Abused, questioned, beaten, but the first female doctors in India were determined: Kavitha Rao https://feminaust.org/abused-questioned-beaten-but-the-first-female-doctors-in-india-were-determined-kavitha-rao/ https://feminaust.org/abused-questioned-beaten-but-the-first-female-doctors-in-india-were-determined-kavitha-rao/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 13:28:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/abused-questioned-beaten-but-the-first-female-doctors-in-india-were-determined-kavitha-rao/ It’s a Google Doodle of Rukhmabai Raut, a young bride who was not only one of India’s first divorcees, but also a revolutionary female doctor, who led London journalist and author Kavitha Rao to a burrow. enchanting rabbit from which her book “Lady Doctors: Untold Stories of India’s First Medical Women” came out. In an […]]]>


It’s a Google Doodle of Rukhmabai Raut, a young bride who was not only one of India’s first divorcees, but also a revolutionary female doctor, who led London journalist and author Kavitha Rao to a burrow. enchanting rabbit from which her book “Lady Doctors: Untold Stories of India’s First Medical Women” came out. In an interview with the Sunday Times, the author talks about the inordinate agitation of women who beaten to study medicine.

Did you choose to title the book “Lady Doctors” in an ironic way? Where does the term come from?

It’s not ironic because that’s what these women were called back then, when female doctors were an anomaly. The first mention that I could find of this term was in the British Medical Journal in 1870, when female doctors were described as “traitorous to their sex.”

In colonial and cloistered India, what kind of labels did these women attract for their decision to pursue medicine?
Kadamabini Ganguly was called a whore, Rukhmabai Raut was called debauched and compared to an adulterous woman, a thief or a murderer. Haimabati Sen was threatened with death when she won a gold medal. Mary Poonen Lukose was criticized for her education abroad and said she had to cultivate “Indian ways”

Of the six 19th-century Indian “medical ladies” your book focuses on, which story left its mark on you the most?
Likely Rukhmabai Raut because she walked away from child marriage, spent years in court to divorce her husband, challenged powerful Tories, went to study in the UK, and ultimately led a long and fulfilling life as a doctor in Rajkot and Surat. Even one of them would be a huge achievement. Together they are almost unbelievable.

Were the men in their life supportive?
Almost all the women were supported by their fathers to study. Husbands were sometimes allies, sometimes fetters. Anandibai’s husband encouraged her to study, but was also physically abusive. Haimabati’s husband did not object to her being a doctor but took all of her income and sometimes beat her. On the other hand, the husbands of Kadambini and Mary Poonen Lukose were reportedly widely supported. In fact, most of the misogyny they faced came from their mothers and loved ones. Haimabati was discouraged from studying by her mother and aunts, as was Muthulakshmi.

Despite their education abroad, female doctors had to earn the trust of patients in India. How far did they have to go?
Kadambini had to go to UK to get a British education as people were reluctant to trust a doctor with an Indian education. Rukhmabai caught a pregnant sheep and delivered her lamb to her hospital to convince the women to come for their deliveries. Mary Poonen Lukose only gained the trust of the community after delivering Travancore Rani’s babies.

Many of these female doctors had to work in a context of famine and disease. What can they teach us about living with Covid-19?

I think Mary Poonen Lukose’s comments on the smallpox vaccination are very revealing of how Covid will ultimately have to be overcome, with immense sacrifice on the part of the public. In 1925, Mary opposed a resolution in the Travancore legislature that sought to make smallpox vaccinations optional. She said: “Small inconveniences and even risks must be encountered by individuals for the greater good of the community as a whole.”

As you read their journals and memoirs, what are the things that struck you?
What immediately struck me was how advanced their views were. Even Anandibai, who apparently played the role of the good Indian wife, had absolutely no fear of crossing the seas alone, at a time when women were totally dependent on their husbands. Indeed, she said, “If this life is so fleeting, why depend on another?

Did their sense of humor surprise you?

Haimabati’s sarcasm about her useless husband definitely surprised me. Particularly this line in his memoirs: “My husband came home and immediately began to ride his high horses. He said: “Women are only thorns on the path of life, obstacles to the spiritual quest”. An elderly lady said to her, “If you have decided to devote your life to spiritual activities, why did you get married?

Did the six female doctors laugh at the term “work-life balance”?

Probably yes! Most of them accepted that they would work and raise their families with very little help. But just because they didn’t know the term didn’t make it easy. Muthulakshmi, for example, wrote in a moment of frustration that female doctors had better stay single because of the difficult balancing act.

Would you call them feminists?

Of course, they were all feminists because they all believed that women were as capable as men of being doctors. Before the concept of equal pay for equal work was accepted in India, Haimabati Sen wrote angrily that she was paid less for her work than men. Rukhmabai has written at length about the fact that marriage is an institution that only benefits men, not women. I would describe their brand of feminism, on the whole, as radical for their time. Or even for our time!



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How Pat LaMarche and “Priscilla the Princess of the Park” dismantle the stigma surrounding homelessness https://feminaust.org/how-pat-lamarche-and-priscilla-the-princess-of-the-park-dismantle-the-stigma-surrounding-homelessness/ https://feminaust.org/how-pat-lamarche-and-priscilla-the-princess-of-the-park-dismantle-the-stigma-surrounding-homelessness/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/how-pat-lamarche-and-priscilla-the-princess-of-the-park-dismantle-the-stigma-surrounding-homelessness/ LaMarche’s book series shines a light on the often understated humanity of homeless populations, emphasizing how the problem is the result of ineffective politics, not personal fault. Writer-activist Pat LaMarche wants people to not care about homelessness, poverty, ageism and racial and gender injustice. Her latest effort, a book series about an elderly homeless person […]]]>


LaMarche’s book series shines a light on the often understated humanity of homeless populations, emphasizing how the problem is the result of ineffective politics, not personal fault.

Writer-activist Pat LaMarche wants people to not care about homelessness, poverty, ageism and racial and gender injustice.

Her latest effort, a book series about an elderly homeless person sleeping in a public park, stars Priscilla and a motley group of children befriending her. They are very diverse, able-bodied and not, with an uncanny ability to look past Priscilla’s tattered clothes to see a wise and witty survivor who loves nothing more than a fake snack every Tuesday afterward. -midday. Charming and cunning, Priscilla is an unlikely teacher, but by sharing her life experiences, she reverses the stigma associated with housing insecurity and improves understanding and empathy for everyone she meets.

Bonnie Tweedy Shaw’s visually appealing illustrations add an unusual blend of whimsy and weight to LaMarche’s storytelling.

“I am a daughter of Irish immigrants,” said LaMarche Mrs. “My grandmother left Ireland because her family couldn’t feed her, so I grew up knowing firsthand the impact of hunger and poverty.”

Indeed, LaMarche attributes to his education the motivation of his work to fight against the harmful effects of the shortage. Her first effort, she says, dates back to the late 1980s when she volunteered at a homeless shelter in Bangor, Maine. “I was a broke single mom, but I cooked dinner for the residents once a month,” she said.

In the decades that followed, LaMarche’s commitment never wavered, and she not only worked as a direct service provider in several shelters, but also served as a social justice reporter. Whether on the radio or in the print media, his news broadcasts have been singularly focused on the struggles of low-income people.

LaMarche also campaigned for public office. As running mate of 2004 Green Party presidential candidate David Cobb, she says she wanted to use that year’s election to elevate national social issues.

“I was doing a radio show in Maine in 2003 and one morning as I was driving to work I heard Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry tell a reporter he would be ready to appoint judges. anti-choice in the judiciary. That was it, “she recalls.” David had harassed me to run for vice president and after Kerry threw me and all the other women in America under the bus, I ‘said’ yes’. It was high time to talk about the issues that mattered.

Nonetheless, LaMarche told Cobb his candidacy was conditional. “I made it clear that I wanted to stay in homeless shelters throughout my travels and use my candidacy to tell people’s stories and highlight the conditions I saw.”

After the election, LaMarche turned to the detailed journals she kept throughout the campaign. These stories formed the basis of his first book, Left Out in America: The State of Homelessness in the United States, published by Sunbury Press in 2006.

Shortly after the book’s publication, LaMarche moved from Maine to Carlisle, Pa., Where he was offered a job at a shelter. It only lasted a few years. “I am an empath,” she said. “I had witnessed so much abject poverty, so much systemic cruelty, that I had to walk away, but I needed the money so I accepted a job as a waitress in a cafe in the city. . ” It quickly became what she calls her “downtown office”.

“The homeless knew how to find me there and the restaurant let me feed them,” she said. “But there was a woman who never entered. She slept in the square and was told that even if the police harassed her, she would not budge. Her name was Priscilla and for me she became Priscilla, the princess of the park.

Unlike the titular Priscilla of the book series, LaMarche reports that the real Priscilla is now in social housing. There are some similarities, however. “The real Priscilla has a lot of fears and a lot of rage. I mean, it’s hard not to be frustrated with some of the bureaucratic nonsense – black and white rules that are insane and punitive – that every poor person encounters.

Namely: in Priscilla and the Bishop’s Gambit, Ken, a homeless single father of twins, learns that because he became homeless before the COVID-19 pandemic, he and his children are not eligible for financial assistance. Worse yet, he is threatened with losing his children after a well-meaning stranger informs child welfare authorities that the family are living in their car.

“Not including the pandemic seemed ethically irresponsible,” said LaMarche, “COVID has been difficult for everyone, but absolutely everything has become 1000 times more difficult for people with no permanent place to live and I wanted to illustrate some of the challenges that they were confronted. . I also wanted to stress that poverty is not a reason to remove children from the care of loving caretakers. “

After that statement, LaMarche took a moment to pull himself together, then continued. “Losing your home is nothing compared to losing your family. A few years ago, I met a mother and her son who had escaped domestic violence with only the clothes on their backs. They told me many times that they were filled with gratitude that they didn’t have to get lost to get to safety.

That statement stuck with LaMarche and she says every character in the books is an amalgamation of people she’s known and conversations she’s had.

“The Priscilla in the books embodies the characteristics of about seven different people,” she said. “I want her to be a nice, but angry spokesperson. She doesn’t easily trust people, especially adults. I hope it helps readers understand that poverty is the reason for homelessness. Period.”

As for her target audience, LaMarche says she hopes children as young as eight will read the books with their parents, guardians, grandparents, teachers or other trusted adults.

“At least 1.5 million school-aged children live without permanent housing,” she said. “Children with housing difficulties usually don’t see themselves reflected in books and I hope the series helps them understand that they are not the only ones going through hard times.”

Getting books into fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, as well as school and public libraries, she says, is a gargantuan task, but she hopes people donate copies to programs in their communities.

“You never know which story is going to make someone’s heart spin,” she said. “I hope people read Priscilla’s books and be motivated to get involved in the fight for social justice, housing justice and equity for all.”

The Priscilla series includes: Priscilla the princess of the park; Priscilla and the Snow Fort; and Priscilla and the Bishop’s Gambit. All are published by the Charles Bruce Foundation; 100 percent of proceeds from book sales go to programs for the homeless. A fourth and final book by Priscilla will be released at the end of 2021.

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How do you solve a problem like Natasha? Marvel’s ‘Black Widow’ is fun but not enough https://feminaust.org/how-do-you-solve-a-problem-like-natasha-marvels-black-widow-is-fun-but-not-enough/ https://feminaust.org/how-do-you-solve-a-problem-like-natasha-marvels-black-widow-is-fun-but-not-enough/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 19:16:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/how-do-you-solve-a-problem-like-natasha-marvels-black-widow-is-fun-but-not-enough/ If you are looking for a few hours of entertainment mixing powerful women with a series of superfluous chase scenes and unlikely fights, Black Widow will do. (Marvel Studios) For readers who haven’t followed the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) for the past decade and more, here’s a spoiler warning. If you don’t want to know […]]]>


If you are looking for a few hours of entertainment mixing powerful women with a series of superfluous chase scenes and unlikely fights, Black Widow will do.

(Marvel Studios)

For readers who haven’t followed the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) for the past decade and more, here’s a spoiler warning. If you don’t want to know what’s happening to Natasha Romanoff aka Black Widow (played by Scarlett johansson) of the 24 films in the franchise, you may want to avoid this review and Black Widow, himself, until you’ve had a chance to catch up.

Even though this new film takes place between the events of Captain America: Civil War (2016) and Avengers: Infinity War (2018), it’s hard to argue without revealing things that happen to Natasha later in the franchise. (If you don’t mind spoilers and just need a quick refresher, the 12 Minute Disney + Captions the video summarizing Nat’s time in the franchise is surprisingly comprehensive.) Black Widow opened last Friday across the country in theaters, as well as via access to premium streaming on Disney +.

As for the plot of the film itself, no spoiler warning is necessary; there is not much to spoil. From beginning to end, Black Widow unfolds with predictable precision. Of course, there are a few unforeseen reveals and characters that behave in ways you might not expect; there are the inevitable betrayals and returns, twists and turns and idiosyncrasies. But there is little about Black Widow it’s really surprising and the film unfolds in a simple and familiar way.

Saying it doesn’t have to be read as a general review – sometimes we strive for predictable entertainment. Sometimes it’s good when the heroes win and the bad guys lose, when those who suffer find the peace they can. For me the problem with Black Widow This is how it resonates with the other MCU movies and with Natasha’s eventual fate. For fans saddened or angered by his death in Avengers: Endgame (2019) – when she martyred herself to secure one of the Infinity Stones and save the universe – Natasha’s first and only solo film can seem like a confusing coda.

Black Widow is not an origin story; it’s more of a superhero vignette, highlighting a gap in the Avengers timeline when Natasha was briefly separated from the rest of her team. We learn more about her abysmal childhood, when her adoptive parents handed Natasha and her equally adopted younger sister, Yelena, to the Red Room, a vicious Russian facility where young girls are trained as assassins or die trying.

The majority of the film deals with the fallout from Natasha’s disastrous family legacy, as she reluctantly searches for her now adult sister (Florence pugh), father Alexei (David Harbor) and mother Melina (Rachel Weisz) in order to destroy the Red Room once and for all. Natasha hasn’t seen her family in 21 years, and yet they all immediately fall into a quarrelsome intimacy that might seem eerily family-friendly if not covered by the dark shadows of loss, pain and years of torture. psychological and physical. Natasha and Yelena endured because of their parents’ choices.

It’s hard to reconcile this dissonance even in the moments when the film tries to lay it bare. While Natasha and Yelena openly express their justified feelings of lingering betrayal and doubt, many of these conversations feel like winding jokes waiting for a punchline.

Even when the sisters first reunite in adulthood, they try to kill each other in a fast-paced, merciless fight that sort of feels like a playful practice match, with its punching streak. , equal kicks and weapon changes. They exchange a brief set of beards where Yelena wonders why Natasha never came to pick her up after Natasha defected and became an Avenger, but, in the end, the women fall back on a brotherly fellowship that seems unlikely. given their traumatic past.

In some ways, that’s normal for the MCU, which is known for trying to strike a balance between action, drama, and humor. Even the darkest Marvel movies include a few required one-liners, and some movies in the franchise seem to be played almost entirely for fun. Black Widow occupies a happy medium. Filled with the dark subjects needed to explain why Natasha has always been such a number – a former spy and assassin who lies easily and whose personality can change as easily as a coin blow – the film also attempts to humanize her by developing her. alongside his eccentric and murderous family.

(Marvel Studios)

Marvel has always struggled with Natasha; she was the first major superhero introduced to the franchise – in Iron man 2 (2010), as a leather-clad SHEILD agent posing as Tony Stark’s notary femme fatale. Over the past decade, Natasha has received much more depth, becoming a haunted but fearless warrior capable of leading the Avengers when all hope seems lost. But her characterization often changes over a series of specters, as if no one (not even writers) can really figure out who she should be: sexy or frosty, kind or brutal, empathetic or overly rational.

The central plot of Black Widow involves the sisters trying to free the other widows, chemically mind-controlled fighters who were kidnapped as daughters by the evil Dreykov (Ray winstone). There are a lot of women in the movie if we include this bunch of fierce but brainwashed assassins, and yet the other widows’ lack of agency means they feel a bit too much like damsels in distress to register as particularly impressive characters. Dreykov even calls them a “natural resource” that he can exploit at will, completely reducing widows to objects to be controlled and waiting to be saved.

On the bright side, Nat’s sister Yelena is a dynamic character and Pugh and Johansson have fluid and exuberant chemistry. The acting is strong overall and the action sequences are fun, although they fall under the “fight first, ask questions later” philosophy of most Marvel movies. If you are looking for a few hours of entertainment mixing powerful women with a series of superfluous chase scenes and unlikely fights, Black Widow will do.

When Natasha was a child, Melina taught her that “pain makes us stronger”. Throughout the franchise, Natasha’s disappointment with herself and her attempts to catch up with her evil past have been central to her motivations as a character. Black Widow aim for this arc of redemption, allowing Natasha to finally erase the “red of [her] register. “But trying to balance some touching moments between a separated family and a roundabout, the action-heavy plot seems both too intense and not enough to soothe the wounds of Nat’s ultimate sacrifice.

Black Widow It may be an enjoyable game at first glance, but as a triumphant farewell to Natasha Romanoff, it feels hollow: too little, too late.

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Women and the lack of time: time creates a gender gap that puts women at a disadvantage https://feminaust.org/women-and-the-lack-of-time-time-creates-a-gender-gap-that-puts-women-at-a-disadvantage/ https://feminaust.org/women-and-the-lack-of-time-time-creates-a-gender-gap-that-puts-women-at-a-disadvantage/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 18:40:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/women-and-the-lack-of-time-time-creates-a-gender-gap-that-puts-women-at-a-disadvantage/ The story we encounter is a narrative over periods of time, written largely by and from the point of view of men. It is an account of the economic, social, political and cultural structures that conceptualize the general morality of society. Gender is a construction of social and cultural interactions and time is a consequence […]]]>


The story we encounter is a narrative over periods of time, written largely by and from the point of view of men. It is an account of the economic, social, political and cultural structures that conceptualize the general morality of society. Gender is a construction of social and cultural interactions and time is a consequence of the same fusion.

The relationship between men and time was the norm placing women on the periphery as they experience time in contrast because society dictates women to view time in relation to their bodies and in reference to others. Society has always measured time in relation to the activities assigned to men. For example, the Mughal era is divided in history according to the reigns of different emperors.

Men experience time in linear terms, which simply means that men measure time in relation to the agency and can decide when to give time to what and to what extent. Women generally lack this luxury because they experience time in relational terms. This means that women put the needs of others before their own and therefore, for them, time is defined by the relationships in their lives.

Where does this paradigm place the question of women and their relationship to time? It wasn’t until the last decade that this uncharted territory began to be explored in trying to understand how time itself is gendered.

Time is one of the most precious resources, it is also deeply political. Conceptions of time have built up hierarchies of power within them, which determine how much time should be given to whom, who gets control, and the basis for its distribution. For example, the time we spend at work or the allocation of resources between different cities is determined by someone with the power.

As time is also measured in political terms with reference to men and their experiences with time, the time spent by women in unpaid work in a capitalist society is often invisible and set aside as an expression of female love and sacrifice.

Time: experienced differently by different genres

People experience time according to various criteria. There is a seasonal weather that is ideally associated with climate change. Ecological weather is usually measured with reference to melting glaciers or increasing greenhouse gases. Biological time is a concept relating to women, where time is measured with the onset of puberty and continues until menopause.

Men experience time in linear terms, which simply means that men measure time according to agency and can decide when to give time to what and to what extent. Women generally lack this luxury because they experience time in relational terms. This means that women put the needs of others before their own and therefore, for them, time is defined by the relationships in their lives. For example, that of a sister, a daughter, a wife, a daughter-in-law, a mother.

One of the things that comes to my mind about women and their schedules is a picture of a woman with many hands, holding an iron box in one, a kitchen utensil in the other, a children’s book in the third, his working papers in the fourth, and so on. The image of a “Multitasking” the woman is so glorified that the women themselves have internalized these traditional gender roles in the household.

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women’s time‘is built according to their’biological clock‘. Traditional ideas about the female body as the sole breeding ground are still prevalent today. Women are thus linked by and with their bodies, hence the conceptualization of their time in reference to their menstrual cycles.

We often admire the way women run the household, but no one ever thinks of sharing the burden with them. According to feminist theorists like Julia Kristeva, the way time is measured differs greatly for men and women. For men, time moves on and they experience new things. For example, they measure time based on monumental landmarks in their life such as buying a car, getting a promotion, etc.

Read also : Housework and the normalization of the “distraught man”

It also stems from a very masculine approach to the notion of time. But ‘women’s time‘is built according to their’biological clock‘. Traditional ideas about the female body as the only breeding ground are still prevalent today. Women are thus linked by and with their bodies, hence the conceptualization of their time in reference to their menstrual cycles. To cite a simple example, women who have their period plan a trip based on their cycle dates. Women’s time is also structured to follow a monotonous and recurring pattern of housework.

How Women Spend Their Time: A Look Inside the Household

The way men and women interact with time is radically different. Men have the privilege of detaching themselves from their household responsibilities. Men operate on what is considered profitable in materialistic terms. They are employed in organizations that operate according to state-sanctioned clock time, where certain signals like dongs represent interruptions in time.

This means that women have to remember to do certain things – wash clothes, order vegetables, make family appointments, etc. It is a permanent and almost always invisible workload. This load ensures that women do not have time to reflect and introspect or simply relax

Women, on the other hand, learned from an early age to internalize their role in the private sphere as primordial and to respond to the needs of their families, not allowing themselves time to reflect and introspection. It shows in the amount of work women have to do at all times when they are at home. That’s what we call mental load.

This means that women have to remember to do certain things – wash clothes, order vegetables, make family appointments, etc. It’s an ongoing workload, and is almost always invisible. This load ensures that women do not have free time to reflect and introspect or simply relax. Thus, women pass about opportunities in their workplace not because they lack creativity or skills, but because they never had the time.

Amidst all the physical labor, women are also expected to ‘give‘their time caring for infants and sick members of the house, adding emotional toil to their list. It is clear that women dedicate their time and space to others as well as their mental space.

It is because of the time women spend in their households in the form of unpaid and unrecognized work that men are productive in the economy. It is because their children do not to bother every minute while working as the parent caring for them.

This is why the balance between time and gender is never maintained. It will always weigh on the woman under the weight of the chores. Men, on the other hand, can lead a good life. The impact of this is visible if we analyze the Corona virus lockdown where women did all work around the home such as cooking and cleaning as well as the extra work of caring for the elderly and their work commitments.

Mental load along with emotional strain and physical labor often lead to burnout in women, a concept that is strongly gendered and not included in our vocabulary enough times.

Feminists and academics like Barbara Adams assert the need to deconstruct time in binary terms because there are many layered conceptions of time. Academics like Emily Apter envisioned time to break away from gender binaries and put forward the idea of ​​gender neutral caregivers to ensure that the unfair allocation of time is dismantled.

Read also : Waste management: how women do all the work but remain undervalued

It is also important to understand the impact of the weather on the LGBTQIA + community. In addition, there is a need to come up with better tools to ensure economic justice for women who outsource their time and labor to different households in the role of domestic helper.

Therefore, it is relevant to think of time as a phenomenon that affects gender and intersectionality differently. We need to integrate surveys of the distribution of time with respect to intersectional parameters other than gender to truly understand the unbalanced nature of how it affects different people.

The references

1. Valerie Bryson, Gender and the Politics of Time: Feminist Theory and Contemporary Debates.

2. Emily Apter, “The Time of Women” in Theory


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Fiona Mozley’s ‘Hot Stew’ Ain’t So Hot: Sex Work Outsiders Are Enlightened https://feminaust.org/fiona-mozleys-hot-stew-aint-so-hot-sex-work-outsiders-are-enlightened/ https://feminaust.org/fiona-mozleys-hot-stew-aint-so-hot-sex-work-outsiders-are-enlightened/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 13:01:28 +0000 https://feminaust.org/fiona-mozleys-hot-stew-aint-so-hot-sex-work-outsiders-are-enlightened/ “Hot Stew” by Fiona Mozley Algonquin Books As a feminist writer who occupies the dual domain of academia and the sex trade, in my experience, writers rarely consider the impact of their writings on the sex worker communities they write about. Women in prostitution are so hijacked by society that editors will hire lawyers to […]]]>


“Hot Stew” by Fiona Mozley Algonquin Books

As a feminist writer who occupies the dual domain of academia and the sex trade, in my experience, writers rarely consider the impact of their writings on the sex worker communities they write about. Women in prostitution are so hijacked by society that editors will hire lawyers to avoid legal action, but not editors from the sex worker community to ensure that the narratives and characters of sex workers that they publish are accurate. This nonchalant recklessness reflects the undeniable class brutality that underlies the argument that in the 21st centuryst-century, should write about sex work. There is an inherent problem with foreign writers, like Fiona Mozley, author of Hot stew released on March 18, 2021, who have actively chosen to take their place on the topic of sex work in the publication spaces.

Contemporary sex workers are tired of the snobbish class warfare in bourgeois academic, artistic and literary spaces. Women are so altered in society by the stigma and shame surrounding sex that privileged middle-class writers feel compelled to write about prostitutes. They do this without worrying too much about professional sex writers and the implications for the actual versions of their literary iterations.

Hot stew by Fiona Mozley is all that is wrong with the contemporary literary landscape of sex work. It is the epitome of the mind-boggling tale created by foreign writers enjoying considerable privileges; that there is room for everyone to write about those who walk our streets. Books written by strangers take up this strange space of how they think about the subcultures of transgressive people. The characters of prostitutes written by writers, such as Mozely, are strangely masculine in their aesthetic. There is an obsession with casting male gazes on the bodies of whores who trap sex workers in well-known literary representations. We think we know the lives of sex workers because we know their portrayal in art, film and media; it traps sex workers in a pathological repetition of crude representations.

Hot stew is the second book by Fiona Mozley (born 1988), a young British writer whose first novel, Elmet (2017), was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. The cover of Hot stew is splattered in hot pink, a nod to the tacky aesthetic of seedy Soho brothels in London, a glowing neon sign synonymous with sex work. Ironically, Hot stew criticizes the gentrifying class wars that seek to eradicate the prostitute within Soho, but the book is sold by a gentrifying visual facade of sex work. Dehumanizing stereotypically disfigured limbs of a sex worker adorn the cover, lazy artistic tropes I would expect when it comes to the visual representation of sex work in popular discourse.

I want you to consider the cover of Hot stew in stark contrast to the cover of The service by Frankie Miren, published June 21, 2021 by Influx Press. Miren, writer, journalist and sex worker, has written a book that explores complex and controversial accounts of sex work without resorting to the stereotype of a baffled body of a whore on its cover. Miren and Influx press hired a sex worker to do the cover and hired a sex worker to photograph the cover image; it takes to know one, as they say. The cover of Hot stew is a visual reduction of the 1970s feminist war on sex that portrays the sex worker as empowered or exploited. Trapping of prostituted women at age 20eThe depictions of the century’s pop-cultural art cleanse the class wars that silence sex workers and reduce prostitutes to the sum of their limbs.

The service by Frankie Miren

Being a sex worker is notoriously difficult. This is especially difficult if you are a sex worker trying to occupy space in a publishing world, who is often more interested in the voices of strangers than in actual writers working in sex. Suddenly, prostitutes like me are curious creatures of otherness and fascination. Typically depicted as supersexual beings, nothing more than a man-made construct that exists as the absolute embodiment of patriarchal male privilege. Often reduced to just a pair of legs, not too different from the blanket of Hot stew.

There is a problem with contemporary writers, who blatantly ignore sex workers and the sex worker communities they write about. I often marvel at the mind-boggling apathy of middle-class writers towards the sex workers they write about. For example, on her now defunct Twitter account, Mozley noted that she had lived in Soho for three months, although in Esquire she claimed four months. The now deleted tweet implied that she was claiming to write about sex work, after receiving well-deserved reviews from real sex workers who had read advance copies of Hot stew. Indeed, Mozley did not contact the English Collective of Prostitutes until after a sex worker complained about the horrible prostitute signage inside Hot stew.

The inference being Mozley’s brief encounter with Soho and his momentary proximity to the lives of sex workers who work in Soho establishments, allows him to write about sex work. Unfortunately, this upright attitude makes Hot stew nothing more than a free piece of raw middle class poverty pornography. In doing so, Mozley is causing damage to real sex workers by erasing the voices of sex workers in literary spaces.

Hot stew is far from precise and is reflected in a stranger’s perception of how she imagines prostitutes. Mozley’s imaginative interpretation of the lives of sex workers translates into a missed opportunity because Hot stew failed to displace the heteronormative white western male gaze that portrays sex workers as anything other than attractive gendered women who always carry a moral message. The moral message of Hot stew is that the eccentric characters living in a Soho ripe for modernization can be sluts, and the accidental activist’s society must fight against the gentrification of neighborhoods.

The two prostitutes, Precious and Tabitha, are reduced to obvious bitch character tropes and are afraid of appearing stupid. The mundane characters of prostitutes reflect the impossibility for writers to see sex workers other than in a sexualized context. Mozley attempts to write about the forced solidarity of those who live in transgressive sexual subcultures. Obviously, Mozley is influenced by the lives of actual Soho prostitutes who struggle with the stigma, shame, violence, and endless problems of policing their bodies by the state.

Sadly, Mozley continues the tradition of sex workers as public women for public consumption. By appropriating the transgressive nature of the prostitute, Mozley has gone the mundane route by publishing a work of fiction, inspired by the real life of sex workers. Hot stew further propagates the global societal obsession and unease with sexuality. The sex worker symbolizing a paradox, possessing her sexuality while being objectified, rejected as a sexual object with notions of ostracism, shame, depression, victimization and repressed desire. Seen as the hypocrisy of respectable society, wealth, class, bourgeois sexuality and capitalism.

Secondary to “Hot Stew” which, instead of the most obviously obnoxious, features an equally disturbing swan being attacked by dogs. Algonquin Books

however, Hot stew is not the most recent book written by a foreigner, nor by a young British author who has received critical acclaim. The is a long story of foreign writers, those writers with no lived experience of sex work, writing about sex work. Matthew Sperling (born 1982) recently published a book on online sex work, a world I know well because I have been selling sex online since 2005. Viral, like Hot stew was inspired by contemporary real-life sex workers. Degenerate women like me who sell sex online through directories and social media platforms. Viral focuses on a cast of middle-class characters drawn to the dark and shady world of online escorts, the belly of the Internet. Mozley is just the latest version of the writer who views sex workers as curious beings ripe for literary mockery. Simply put, it would be nice if writers like Sperling and Mozley stopped writing and enjoying the lives of marginalized women. The service is dedicated to sex workers everywhere, I cried when I read what Miren wrote in the acknowledgments section;

“My book owes everything to the many sex workers I have known over the years; I am so grateful to all of you. I have been doing sex work in a traumatized secret for a long time, and finding out about a community was revolutionary.

Like Sperling, Mozley missed an opportunity in the book’s acknowledgments to thank the community of sex workers who inspired Hot stew; Sperling, however, at least thanked his dog.

Just because outsiders like Mozley can write about marginalized communities doesn’t mean they should. Rather, their questionable ethical approaches and jaded attitudes about writing about sex worker communities should be held to higher standards, given the devastating real-life consequences for sex workers. It is telling that Sperling and Mozley have deleted their Twitter accounts; I imagine the retreat of real sex workers angry at their literary middle-class interpretation of sex worker lives has been hard to bear.

Fiona Mozley's



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Dear Governor Simon, beware of Greeks carrying gifts | United States and Canada https://feminaust.org/dear-governor-simon-beware-of-greeks-carrying-gifts-united-states-and-canada/ https://feminaust.org/dear-governor-simon-beware-of-greeks-carrying-gifts-united-states-and-canada/#respond Sun, 11 Jul 2021 15:57:02 +0000 https://feminaust.org/dear-governor-simon-beware-of-greeks-carrying-gifts-united-states-and-canada/ Too often, journalists are concerned with the “who” to be concerned with the “why”. This squeaky trend was predictably manifested in the wake of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s belated decision – as some insist – to appoint an Indigenous woman as governor general earlier this week. Mary Simon, an Inuit leader and former diplomat, […]]]>


Too often, journalists are concerned with the “who” to be concerned with the “why”.

This squeaky trend was predictably manifested in the wake of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s belated decision – as some insist – to appoint an Indigenous woman as governor general earlier this week.

Mary Simon, an Inuit leader and former diplomat, is the first Indigenous person to serve as Canada’s titular head of state.

“Canada is a place to find a people, a people who serve those around them; who meet the great challenges with hope and determination and, above all, who never stop working to build a better future. In other words, people like Mary Simon, ”Trudeau said of introducing the new Governor General at a press conference.

The Prime Minister has been applauded by a gushing establishment press that always gushes and applauds when another Governor General is unveiled in a uniquely Canadian marching band. (More on that later.)

Yet several writers have berated Trudeau for not appointing Simon governor general in 2017, choosing instead to elevate astronaut and engineer, Julie Payette, to the frilly ceremonial post. (More on Payette later, too.)

Left unanswered amid all the soft tsk-tsking – so as not to deviate from the historical moment – was the reason Trudeau hesitated in making his “revolutionary” selection.

The answer lies in Trudeau’s cynical and calculating modus operandi.

In 2017, Trudeau and his haughty group of scholarly advisers likely calibrated that there was little to no public relations dividends to be derived from the appointment of an Indigenous governor general, although several prominent candidates were promoted. at the time.

The persistent and crushing injustices and deprivation that remain a common feature of the lives of many First Nations in Canada were not very much on the myopic radar of the media. They didn’t matter then.

Thus, Trudeau and the optical company still in search of a profitable optical company chose to replace an aging male academic with the young, intelligent and exuberant Payette to confirm the good faith “feminist” of the new Prime Minister. – which counted at the time. .

To prove the politically timely point, an approving admirer / commentator quickly praised Trudeau for his “choice inspired by a feminist prime minister who frequently speaks of the importance of female heroes to his own young daughter.”

Parish mission accomplished.

By 2021, however, Canada’s political and cultural landscape had radically changed and Trudeau, always keen to harness the prevailing wind, appointed Simon to the antiquated post to point out, once again, his “progressive” credentials at the dawn of time. ‘a federal election that it is. should call soon.

The glow of Payette’s North Star had faded, fatally tarnished by a damning report of constant and disturbing allegations that Rideau Hall – the official residence of the Governor General – was plagued by intimidation and harassment .

Payette resigned – instantly abandoned and deemed persona non grata by the same “feminist” prime minister who had confidently insisted that “Madame Payette was going to become an extraordinary governor general.” It represents the best of Canadian values.

Months later, the shocking discovery of graves filled with the bodies of over a thousand and counting indigenous children – all victims of the church-run and state-sanctioned internment camps otherwise known as the “Residential schools” – pushed indigenous “issues” to the forefront of fluctuating media consciousness.

Taken together, these two seemingly disparate events provided Trudeau with an opening not only to distance himself from the Payette debacle he authored, but to demonstrate that the long-forgotten plight of this country’s Indigenous peoples was suddenly at the top. of his opportunistic mind – and he did.

Parish mission accomplished – once again.

But Simon would be wise to remember that the Prime Minister and an equally inconstant gallery of experts praising her today as a gifted and perhaps transformational figurehead, once inundated Payette, now permanently in purgatory, with the same generic distinctions using almost verbatim. fluid and effervescent language.

Ms. Payette’s life has been about discovery, dreaming big, and always staying focused on the things that matter most. These truly Canadian traits, along with her years of public service, make her unmistakably qualified for this high. function, ”Trudeau said in July 2017.

One enamored scribe wrote: “Justin Trudeau sent a powerful message by appointing an engineer and a scientist – and, oh yes, an astronaut as governor general… As a symbol of scientific excellence, Julie Payette is the woman whose Canada needs.

And, finally, a dew-eyed columnist celebrated Payette as, of course, an ambitious national symbol. “The role of the modern governor general is now to be that kind of national symbol: Prime ministers no longer make it a political reward, but try to find someone above the fray who represents what Canada is.” or aspires to be. “

As a Republican, I am allergic – philosophically and professionally – to those sticky, embarrassing trinkets that equate a worn out and anachronistic institution with “service” and the amorphous and fantastical notions of “symbols” that are meant to embody and convey information. vague, often indecipherable “messages” by their words and their actions in royal hues.

Despite all the silly and pretentious rhetoric, Payette has proven to be an imperfect figure who allegedly berated and intimidated his staff to tears and created a ‘toxic workplace’.

Given Payette’s public trajectory from “modern,” a dazzling “symbol” of “what Canada is or aspires to be” to the excommunicated outcast, a question comes to mind: why such a talented and accomplished woman like Simon Would she risk the same unfortunate fate by agreeing to play an antediluvian role which, constitutionally, requires her to take orders without question from a prime minister and kneel before a queen?

Simon takes on a dictatorial post which will also mean, to a large extent, that she read speeches and in some cases write them up by the Prime Minister’s staff, ride in a horse-drawn carriage during parades, that she pledges allegiance and speaks soothing things about a nation and monarchy that have caused deep and indelible damage and harm to the Indigenous peoples of Canada.

Ironically, just two days after Simon was christened the next Governor General, another formidable Indigenous woman, MP Jody Wilson-Raybould, announced that she would not stand for re-election.

In a letter explaining his decision, Wilson-Raybould pointed a sharp and accusatory finger at the Prime Minister who had just appointed Simon.

The “crisis” facing Canadian democracy, Wilson-Raybould wrote, was the product of “a lack of inclusiveness. The power of the Prime Minister and the centralization of power in the hands of those who are not elected. The erosion of guiding principles and conventions to the point where the consequences of unlawful acts committed for political ends are limited or non-existent ”.

Wilson-Raybould’s not-so-camouflaged and scathing indictment of Trudeau’s essential punitive character arose out of her experience as an Indigenous woman turned Minister of Justice and Attorney General who refused to appease a prime minister when ” he repeatedly pressured her to drop the criminal prosecution of a major Quebec engineering firm facing charges of bribery and corruption, and enter into a plea deal at the eve of a federal vote.

For standing up for and upholding the rule of law, Wilson-Raybould’s loyalty, honesty and motives have been “called into question” by the Prime Minister and his caucus eager to please the kid-king – with the exception of another principled minister. Ultimately Wilson-Raybould was kicked out of Cabinet and the Liberal Party to sit as an independent in Parliament.

To his credit, Wilson-Raybould hailed Simon’s appointment as governor general on Twitter – while simultaneously making, it seems, an indirect reference to Trudeau’s mercenary nature. “Congratulations to Her Excellency Ms. Mary J. May Simon… grateful for your knowledge, dignity and integrity in these difficult times.”

She could have added this warning: Beware of Greeks carrying gifts.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial position of Al Jazeera.



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Feminist opposition to German Islamic immigrants https://feminaust.org/feminist-opposition-to-german-islamic-immigrants/ https://feminaust.org/feminist-opposition-to-german-islamic-immigrants/#respond Sat, 10 Jul 2021 09:17:31 +0000 https://feminaust.org/feminist-opposition-to-german-islamic-immigrants/ Why do some Europeans discriminate against Muslim immigrants? And how can these prejudices be reduced? Political scientist Nicholas Sanbanis has studied this question at stations across Germany conducting groundbreaking research with aspiring attendees, unfamiliar passers-by and, most recently, bags of lemon. .. His latest study, co-authored with Donghyun Danny Choi of the University of Pittsburgh […]]]>


Why do some Europeans discriminate against Muslim immigrants? And how can these prejudices be reduced? Political scientist Nicholas Sanbanis has studied this question at stations across Germany conducting groundbreaking research with aspiring attendees, unfamiliar passers-by and, most recently, bags of lemon. ..

His latest study, co-authored with Donghyun Danny Choi of the University of Pittsburgh and Mathias Poertner of the University of Texas A&M, was published on July 8. American Journal of Political Science Then, in daily interactions with ethnic Germans, we find evidence of severe discrimination against Muslim women. The evidence comes from experimental interventions set up on platforms in dozens of German cities, and the discrimination of women in Germany is due to their belief that Muslims are regressive in terms of women’s rights. It’s clear that. Indeed, their experiences found feminist opposition to Muslims and showed that discrimination was eliminated when Muslim women showed that they shared a progressive gender attitude. San Banis, who oversees the Pen Identity and Conflict Lab (PIC Lab) he founded, said he came to Penn in 2016.

Many studies in psychology show that prejudice and discrimination are rooted in the sense that ethnic, racial or religious differences create distance between citizens, he says. “Faced with a wave of immigrants from culturally different populations, many Europeans, for example, by banning the hijab in public places or by forcing immigrants to take language courses. By removing ethnic or religious markers, we are increasingly supporting a policy of forced assimilation that eliminates the causes of these differences, ”explains Sanbanis. “Our research shows that much less coercive means can reduce stigma and discrimination unless migrants threaten the core values ​​that define the social identity of indigenous peoples.”

The Hijab Effect: Feminist Opposition to Islamic Immigrants is the fourth study in a multi-year project led by San Banis and the team on how to reduce stigma against immigrants. Research co-authors Choi and Poertner started working on this project as post-docs at the PIC lab.

A new article, published in the National Academy of Sciences Minutes in 2019, examined whether discrimination against immigrants would be reduced when they were shown to share the standards of citizens valued by indigenous peoples. Based on the first stage of the project. The study found evidence that shared standards reduce but do not eliminate discrimination. A new study will examine the impact of norms and ideas that are important to a particular subgroup of indigenous peoples and find stronger impacts when these norms are shared by migrants.

The findings have implications for how to think about reducing conflict between indigenous and migrant communities at a time of increasing cross-border migrants, says San Banis.

He and his co-authors conducted large-scale field experiments involving more than 3,700 unknown passers-by in 25 cities in Germany.

“Germany was a good case study because it has received the most asylum applications in Europe since 2015 due to the refugee crisis caused by the wars in Syria and other countries in the Middle East and ‘Central Asia. San Banis said. “Germany has a long history of immigrants from Islamic countries since the start of the post-war period, and anti-immigrant sentiment has grown due to cultural differences. These differences are politically manipulated and become more important. “

The intervention was as follows: A woman who participated in the investigation approached the station bench and a passer-by was waiting to attract attention by asking if she could buy a ticket on the train.

She then received a phone call and spoke to her in German about her sister, who was wondering whether she should work or stay at home to take care of her husband and children. The scripted conversation revealed the woman’s position on whether her sister was allowed to work or had to stay home to care for her family.

At the end of the call, the bag she had seemed torn dropped a bunch of lemons, strewn on the platform, and she seemed to need help retrieving them.

In the last stage, the members of the team who were not part of the intervention, each spectator call I helped the woman collect the lemons.

They experimentally changed the identity of women. The women were sometimes German or immigrants from the Middle East. Immigrants sometimes wore hijabs to show their Muslim identity, and sometimes they didn’t.

They found that men did not accept many messages about women’s attitudes towards gender equality, but German women did. Among German women, anti-Islamic discrimination was ruled out when immigrant women reported a progressive view of women’s rights. Men continued to discriminate under the regressive and progressive conditions of experience.

It was surprising that the experimental treatment did not appear to make a significant difference in the behavior of men towards Muslim women.

“Women were very well received by this message that Muslims shared a progressive belief in women’s rights, but men were indifferent to it,” says San Banis. “There was a difference and I expected the treatment to be more effective in women, but I did not expect it to be essentially zero for men.”

This experience highlights gender identity and works with ethnic German women (most of whom share a progressive gender vision). Immigrants Women In a progressive state. It is the basis for reducing discrimination and does not require coercive measures to force Muslims to remove the hijab, San Banis says. “While discrimination can be overcome in other ways, it is important to show that both groups share a common set of norms and ideas that define appropriate civilian behavior. “

The results are surprising in terms of previous literature, assuming that it is very difficult for people to overcome barriers created by race, religion and ethnicity. At the same time, this experience shows the limits of multiculturalism, says San Banis. “Our work shows that we can overcome differences in ethnic, racial or linguistic traits, but citizens support the generous adaptation of the values ​​of others and define their identities for many years. I resist the abandonment of norms and ideas, ”he says.


Clarify the source of discrimination against immigrants


For more information:
Dong Hyun Danny Choi et al. Penalties of the hijab: feminist opposition to Islamic immigrants, American Journal of Political Science (2021). DOI: 10.1111 / ajps.12627

Quote: “Hijab Effect”: Feminist Opposition to Muslim Immigrants in Germany (July 10, 2021) is https: //phys.org/news/2021-07-hijab-effect-feminist-backlash-muslim.html Obtained from July 10, 2021

This document is subject to copyright. No part may be reproduced without written permission, except for fair dealing for the purposes of personal investigation or research. The content is provided for informational purposes only.



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Book Review: ‘The Startup Wife’ by Tahmima Anam – Leisure News https://feminaust.org/book-review-the-startup-wife-by-tahmima-anam-leisure-news/ https://feminaust.org/book-review-the-startup-wife-by-tahmima-anam-leisure-news/#respond Fri, 09 Jul 2021 13:12:29 +0000 https://feminaust.org/book-review-the-startup-wife-by-tahmima-anam-leisure-news/ Three New Yorkers who have always felt like outsiders: Asha, the immigrant; Jules, the poor little rich boy; and Cyrus, the unemployed hippie spirit guide, eventually become the founders of a million dollar startup. Asha is the coder and Jules is the entrepreneur, but it is Cyrus with his enviable hair and sufficient memory for […]]]>


Three New Yorkers who have always felt like outsiders: Asha, the immigrant; Jules, the poor little rich boy; and Cyrus, the unemployed hippie spirit guide, eventually become the founders of a million dollar startup. Asha is the coder and Jules is the entrepreneur, but it is Cyrus with his enviable hair and sufficient memory for obscure religious rites who becomes the star and, later, the villain, of the start-up WAI ( pronounced “why”, short for We are Infinite), an app that “anticipates people’s need for meaning and ritual”. Yeah.

Tahmima Anam creates a fun parody of today’s tech startup culture in The Startup Wife, with exposed brick walls, aversion to vowels (the characters eat at restaurants called “Pikl” and “Mylkist”) and “vegan superfoods” like “hemp mylkshake coffee with extra CBD shots” —the smart hits keep coming. How lovely it would have been if the book had also made a significant contribution to the conversation about consent, feminism, women in male-dominated professions, and any other wide array of complex issues it tries to cover. Unfortunately, it doesn’t do much other than reaffirm what the reader probably already knows – that technology can’t save the world, and men will sometimes let you down.

Worse yet, Anam applies the same broad strokes to her characters, which look like cardboard cutouts depicting some really interesting and complex people. We never get to know the cool-headed, nerdy programmer Asha any better, nor do we understand how the sensitive, utterly obnoxious artist Cyrus came to be. Likewise, the extensive cast of young founders, whose whole personality can be summed up in mere adjectives, lacks nuance – the militant vegan, the founder, the serious coder, the fatherly CFO.

What annoys the most is that Anam doesn’t seem to present any clear point of view on the issues she is addressing. Yes, women play as much a role in self-decline as men; yes, not all organic superfoods in the world can protect against climate change; yes, men have a fragile ego; and, yes, the startup world is starting to look a lot like a cartoon itself. These seem to be the only messages, scribbled in pencil without shadow or depth. Opinion can come disguised as a parody and humor can make you think and feel; unfortunately, The Startup Wife doesn’t even try to be more.

It’s entertaining and I hiked it on a lazy weekend. But once finished, I forgot everything.



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Top 10 Platonic Friendships in Fiction | Books https://feminaust.org/top-10-platonic-friendships-in-fiction-books/ https://feminaust.org/top-10-platonic-friendships-in-fiction-books/#respond Thu, 08 Jul 2021 01:06:33 +0000 https://feminaust.org/top-10-platonic-friendships-in-fiction-books/ TThe use of the adjective “fair” for good friends has always struck me as inadequate. Several of my friendships were marked and defined by an important characteristic labeled by Carolyn Winifred Oulton (in her book Romantic friendship in Victorian literature) as “intense feeling”. These were platonic friendships that involved many tropes of romance: desire, letter […]]]>


TThe use of the adjective “fair” for good friends has always struck me as inadequate. Several of my friendships were marked and defined by an important characteristic labeled by Carolyn Winifred Oulton (in her book Romantic friendship in Victorian literature) as “intense feeling”.

These were platonic friendships that involved many tropes of romance: desire, letter writing, making playlists, fear of loss of self, or an embrace to the contrary: a kind of self. -expansion in the possibility of friendship. Basically, they contained a bare form of need, something that had to do with the potential for joy, but could also go wrong.

In my novel You people, Nia, 19, befriends Tuli, owner of the restaurant where she works. At first, she cannot categorize the relationship with him – they are not physically involved, but sometimes it seems intimate, hypnotic, familial. There is the acute certainty that this is important.

Sex can be an absent presence in a platonic friendship of course. In fiction, it may be clear to the reader, even if not to the characters themselves, that Eros is obscured or suppressed for a number of reasons. In life, that same libidinous drive can roar or be sublimated at any point in the course of friendship.

But for the sake of this piece, I’m going to go with this idea of ​​“feeling intense” bonding in fictitious friendships where there is no carnal activity and call it platonic.

1. Sula by Toni Morrison
Long before the fever and the dream of Lila and Lenu in Elena Ferrante’s epic series of Neapolitan novels, and the haunting “imaginative empathy”Of female friendship in Zadie Smith’s Swing Time, we had Sula and Nel busy dancing to societal notions of class, race, and marriage. Set in a black community in the hills of Ohio between 1919 and 1965, where white gentrification quickly encroaches, the book revolves around the bond between the two men as they become women. They hurt each other and have to do it, but the power they display together comes from their difference and the paradigm-shifting issues they raise. The end, calamitous but liberating, is a masterful study of regret.

2. A painful case of James Joyce
Mr Duffy believes he cultivates the kind of nutritious company that looks like ‘garden soil’ around his roots, but when his platonic girlfriend, Ms Sinico, interrupts their regular conversations about truth and beauty to suddenly press his hand against his cheek, Duffy is spiraled into an existential hell. He cuts off all contact, appalled. Years later, he reads in the newspaper that Ms. Sinico was hit by a train and started drinking in the years after their friendship ended. Duffy’s reaction is not pleasant – first he experiences a sort of revulsion at his disgusting ending, then he ruminates on how he was left out of the “feast of life” – could it be that he wasted his life being so puritanical?

3. The Tree That Gives by Shel Silverstein
This relationship between a tree and a boy is beautifully simple until it isn’t – the boy grows happily swinging from the branches of the tree, but begins to take liberties. He engraves his darling’s initials in the bark, removes apples, he even cuts off its branches, invoking the need for money. Through it all, even when he finally cuts the tree into a stump with an almost psychotic carelessness, the tree constantly claims to be happy. The mystery: do we all have to channel the Zen sensitivity of the tree or does this lead to its ruin?

4. A Wreath of Roses by Elizabeth Taylor
Director Beddoes’ portrayal of Taylor, who corresponds with artist Frances after admiring her paintings, is imbued with emotional intelligence. Ultimately, the one-on-one relationship Beddoes cultivates with Frances cannot compete with her obsessive love of the still images she creates. It’s a relief for Frances, who is more interested in deepening and darkening her artistic practice than dealing with her fanboy bluster. But Beddoes is a useful provocation, and it makes her stop and consider her past, present and future.

Complicated… Pip (Michael York) with Joe Gargery (Joss Ackland) in the 1974 television version of Great Expectations. Photograph: ITV / Rex / Shutterstock

5. The Great Expectations of Charles Dickens
Dickens has a traditional love story in this book, which resurfaces at regular intervals during Pip’s journey from apprentice blacksmith to high society. But he’s also worried about how the aspiration can rot the soul, as evidenced by the complicated friendship between Pip and Joe. Pip admires Joe when he is little, but once he begins his ascent he sees Joe and feels nothing but the shame of his own humble origins. Joe is optimistic about this unseemly part of Pip, because he understands it so well: “You and I aren’t two characters to be together in London; nor anywhere else than what is private, known and understood among friends.

6. The World According to Garp by John Irving
Professional footballer Robert becomes Roberta with gender reassignment surgery after reading A Sexual Suspect, the cult feminist text written by Garp’s mother, Jenny. He’s a precocious trans character, and by far the most attractive character in the novel, someone who suffers “from the vanity of a middle-aged man and the anxieties of a middle-aged woman … a perspective which is not without advantages ”. Roberta and Garp play squash regularly and a strong friendship ensues. In a book that says a lot about the vicissitudes of lust, their platonic intimacy is a delight.

7. Late in the day from Tessa Hadley
This novel, scintillating with what writer James Salter called “perfect knowledge and careful observationContains several configurations of Platonic friendship. Alex and Zach have known each other since school, as have Christine and Lydia (their wives). In the intersection of ambition and deception that separates them over the decades, there is another chiasmic, almost platonic “happy company”. Read it to marvel at the rich delineation of personality and meaning.

8. Doris Lessing’s The Good Terrorist
Alice and Jasper have moved from squat to squat for 15 years and are now involved in protests against “Queen Bitch Thatcher”. Alice claims to love Jasper in the conventional sense, although she knows he prefers men. His rejection of her may seem cruel, but Alice is also a little relieved that nothing can blossom between them, precisely, that no child can come out of their bond. It’s a novel of ideas, and Lessing’s exhilarating intelligence is the driving force, as she takes us on the crossroads of the personal and the political.

9. A Nice Balance by Rohinton Mistry
Dina is a widow who has a student tenant named Maneck, and two tailors – Ishvar and Omprakash – living with her in Mumbai during the state of emergency in 1975. They together form a makeshift family. The dysfunction of the outside world is bruising and injuring all four of them – we are seeing forced sterilization, castration, limbs amputated, lives and homes lost – but the relationship is a vessel that keeps them in the worst. moments.

ten. The ephemera of Andrew O’Hagan
Tully Dawson, 20, factory machinist and storyteller, is a dizzying, cinematic best friend for the ages. Jimmy, from the same estate in Ayrshire, wants to be around him as much as possible. It’s 1986. They share quotes from the movie A Taste of Honey and lyrics from Joy Division, and head to Manchester for a weekend of euphoric concerts. We see Tully and Jimmy 30 years later when one of them receives bad news. But they will still have Manchester. This is O’Hagan’s most autobiographical novel, and he says of the real friendship that inspired him: “I still dream of it, this Manchester – the orange buses and the long clear afternoon light, knowing there would be more drink, more laughter, with the future at bay.”



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