Louisville mayor’s budget plan ‘reinvents’ public safety with more money for violence prevention

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JENNIFER: – RICK: HIS BUDGET ALSO FOCUSED ON PUBLIC SAFETY AND RACIAL RIDING WLKY’S MARK VANDERHOFF JOINS US LIVE FROM METRO HALL WITH MORE. MARK, WHAT IS IN THIS PLAN? REPORTER: SOME OF THE PRIORITIES INCLUDE SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE FOR COLLEGES AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING AND MORE MONEY THAN EVER FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAMS. WITH CRIME DURING THE PANDEMIC, THE PROPOSED BUDGET INCREASES SPENDING FOR PUBLIC SECURITY PROGRAMS OUTSIDE THE POLICE DEPARTMENT, FROM $ 5 TO $ 20 MILLION BUSINESSES AND WORKERS ALSO FIGHT. THEREFORE THE BUDGET INCLUDES $ 10 MILLION FOR THE WEST END LOUISVILLE PARTNERSHIP, A NEW ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM, $ 2.7 MILLION IN ASSISTANCE TO SMALL BUSINESSES AND $ 1.5 MILLION IN BUSINESS LOANS. THE CITY ALSO CONTRIBUTES $ 3 MILLION TO EVOLUTION 502, WHICH GIVES COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS TO JCPS STUDENTS. AND $ 350,000 FOR THE FUTURE WORK INITIATIVE WITH MICROSOFT THAT PROVIDES TRAINING FOR DATA JOBS AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. FISCHER SAYS CITY MUST ENSURE ALL RESIDENTS PARTICIPATE IN ECONOMIC RECOVERY. MAYOR FISCHE PART OF OUR STRATEGY IS TO INVEST IN PROGRAMS THAT HAVE PROVEN RESULTS. WITH INCREASED FUNDING, WE CAN SCALE THESE PROGRAMS AND INCREASE THEIR IMPACT ON INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES. WE ARE PROUD OF THESE EFFORTS BUT KNOW THAT WE MUST DO MORE TO IMPROVE THE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK FOR OUR CITY AND OUR RESIDENTS. REPORTER: DESPITE ALL THE ECONOMIC PROBLEMS WE HAVE SEEN, CITY OFFICIALS SAY TURNOVER IS EXPECTED TO GROW A LITTLE OVER 3% OVER THE NEXT TAX YEAR. THEREFORE, NO MAJOR BUDGET Cuts. AND THIS PROPOSED $ 986 MILLION BUDGET DOES NOT EVEN INCLUDE $ 430 MILLION

Louisville mayor’s budget plan ‘reinvents’ public safety with more money for violence prevention

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer wants to maintain funding for the Louisville Metro Police Apartment, but quadruple the amount the city spends on violence prevention programs. reporters Thursday, hours before his annual budget speech. He said he wanted to reinvent public safety, and his proposed budget also includes investments that he says will allow more people to participate in the city’s economic recovery, as COVID-19 vaccinations are giving the boost. hope the pandemic will begin to fade away. Funding for violence prevention programs would increase from $ 4.9 million to $ 19.5 million in expected federal stimulus for the city over the next year as the US Treasury has yet to issued guidelines on how the money can be spent, Fischer said. million. This would include: $ 5 million for new “diversion and diversion” programs. In these programs, social workers can accompany a police officer or be sent in place of a police officer, for example. $ 550,000 for the Group Violence Initiative, which aims to help known offenders so that they do not continue to commit crimes. program that provides educational and vocational opportunities for young offenders. Fischer’s budget also proposes spending for programs aimed at building wealth in minority communities. Highlights include: $ 10 million for the West End Louisville Partnership, a new economic development program approved by the state legislature that could provide $ 10 million in additional state funds. $ 10 million for the Affordable Housing Trust Fund. $ 3 million for a down payment assistance program To enable more Louisville residents to participate in the economic recovery, Fischer also wants to provide job training opportunities and small business assistance. This includes: $ 2.7 million in assistance to small businesses. $ 1.5 million for METCO loans, which often serve as bridges for small businesses seeking commercial loans from banks. Contribution of $ 3 million to Evolve 502, which provides college scholarships to JCPS students. $ 350,000 for the future of Work Initiative with Microsoft, which offers training in data and artificial intelligence. Despite the economic difficulties of the past year, revenues have not fallen as much as those responsible for the city ​​foresaw it. Revenue is also expected to increase by just over three percent in the next fiscal year. These conditions, combined with federal stimulus measures, mean the budget proposal does not include major budget cuts, Fischer said.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer wants to maintain funding for the Louisville Metro Police Apartment, but quadruple the amount the city spends on violence prevention programs.

“Putting more money just in the police force is not a practical strategy and it does not work,” Fischer told reporters on Thursday, hours before his annual budget speech. He said he wanted to reinvent public safety.

His proposed budget also includes investments that he says will allow more people to participate in the city’s economic recovery, as COVID-19 vaccinations give hope that the pandemic will begin to subside.

The $ 986 million plan does not include $ 430 million in federal stimulus that is expected to be delivered to the city over the next year, as the U.S. Treasury has yet to release guidance on how the money can be spent, Fischer said.

Funding for violence prevention programs would increase from $ 4.9 million to $ 19.5 million. This would include:

  • $ 5 million for new “diversion and diversion” programs. In such programs, social workers may accompany a police officer or be sent in his stead, for example.
  • $ 550,000 for the Group Violence Initiative, which aims to help known offenders avoid continuing to commit crimes.
  • $ 500,000 for Reimage, a program that provides education and job training opportunities for young offenders.

Fischer’s budget also proposes spending for programs aimed at building wealth in minority communities. Strengths include:

  • $ 10 million for the West End Louisville Partnership, a new economic development program approved by the state legislature that could provide $ 10 million in additional funds for the state.
  • $ 10 million for the Affordable Housing Trust Fund.
  • $ 3 million for a down payment assistance program to increase homeownership.

To ensure that more Louisville residents participate in the economic recovery, Fischer also wants to provide job training opportunities and help small businesses. Including:

  • $ 2.7 million in assistance to small businesses.
  • $ 1.5 million for METCO loans, which often serve as bridges for small businesses seeking commercial loans from banks.
  • Contribution of $ 3 million to Evolve 502, which provides college scholarships to JCPS students.
  • $ 350,000 for the Future of Work initiative with Microsoft, which offers training in data and artificial intelligence.

Despite the economic turmoil of the past year, revenues have not fallen as much as city officials expected. Revenue is also expected to increase by just over 3% over the next fiscal year.

These conditions, combined with federal stimulus measures, mean the budget proposal does not include major budget cuts, Fischer said.

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